Get Authentic with Marques Ogden
Get Authentic with Marques Ogden

Episode 28 · 2 weeks ago

Get Authentic with Marques Ogden- Special Episode 12 Jillian Haslam

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

During this interview, Marques sits down with Jillian who shares her powerful story of being raised in the poorest parts of India, and how with education and inspiration she got herself into a position to live a successful life, then she went back to her roots and served her community and do to the amazing work she has been doing, she ended up winniong a Mother Teresa Humanitarian Award....

Yeah, Ye, lordly one and of the special episode, number twelve of the get often pick with marcus ship. I'm your host, Marcus Ogden, and today we're joined by Jillian Castle. She is a Mother Teresa Award recipient winner. Before bring jilling up to the stage, we'll think a few of our amazing sponsors. Century twenty one connect realty with Lee Vallet, a realtor Brando Atlanta, Georgia. Nationwide exteriors are roofing brand out of Orlando, Florida. Deflect at LLC, a shoulder protection device brand out of Colorado, Bill Keeper and Associates, a consulting brand out of Ohio, big l speaking, a speaking brand. I Have New Jersey and a must win financial literacy, helping athletes with marketing, branding and going fishing in the nil space. Now let's bring up to the stage our guest, Jillian hassling. Jillian, how you doing today? Very well, marcous. Thank you so much for having me on the show. I was I was more than delighted to be invited and I couldn't believe it actually when you reached out to me. So thank you, Jillian. Thank you so much for coming on our show. You have an amazing story. But before we bit to that story, Julian, what does the word authentic, slash authenticity mean to Jillian Hasslm? Well, for me, Um Marcus, it's twofold. For me, I think authenticity is when you can be the real you and you can make everyone around you feel comfortable just by being you. And I think, secondly, the way I would position it is, or explain it, is that whenever when the whole world wants you to be someone else and you refuse to be that someone else, but you just be yourself, the real you. That, to me is authenticity, when everybody in the world wants you to be someone else but you are gonna stay true to who you are and be the real you. That is authenticity. To Jillian has some and I agree and I love it, and that's exactly why we started our show. And it's a special number, twelve. And again this story is going to blow your way. Jillian, would you please show our audience your story, where you're from up,...

...bringing all your work to travels and, of course, how you became a mother terracea award recipient winner. Sure, Marcus, quat question Um. Well, from the time we were let me go back to my parents. So my both my parents, I have British ancestry on both sides. My Mother's actually got a mix of Scottish and army and my father, his parents are British on both ends. They were born in India, but their parents were born here in the UK and they were born in India during the time of the British Rujuh in n seven, India got her independence. They were given one year and it's to leave the country. Hundreds of families chose to come back to the UK, including my dad's sister and brought all her children and came back. But hundreds of families chose to stay back in India because they had great lives and of course, the weather and they thought everything is going to remain the same. But it didn't, unfortunately, and many families, I talked about mine in this instance, were reduced to absolutely nothing. So we were reduced to living under a flight of stairs. And before that my mother took my little sister and myself from one person's house to the other. Sometimes we were allowed to stay on, sometimes we were asked to move on. Sometimes they said they could feed us and sometimes they refused and eventually a very kind gentleman offered my father a place, a little village school, which is hardly a village school. There's a picture of that in my book. It's two very tiny, broken down shacks really to open a school um in a place called Dundon. But when we got there, UM, and before that my parents had lost two children to abject poverty and man nutrition, two girls, Carol and many. And when my mom my parents got to Dundon, this little place outside the city of Calcutta, Um my mother was pregnant with twins, a girl and a boy, Kimberly and Alan, and we lost both of them, also before the ages of six months, to abject poverty and malne fishing. But then thanks got worse and there was a kidnap arranged for my elder sister, Dona, because she was blonde and blew eye and whatever, and the villagers said to my dad, if you send her back to Calcutta, the other two will be taken from you. That's myself and my little sister in Essa. So my parents basically had to take us by night and we went over fields and fields and fields, and the villagers helped us and we we escaped from that place, pretty much like the one track family, only without any money or anything else, and we got back to the city of Calcutta where my m on the way back, my father almost lost his eyesight because he had a stroke on the train. It was too much for him, I think, losing four children one after the other, uh serving in the army, it all got too much. And...

Anyway, my mother put him into the Salvation Army, which at that time was a place looking after ex servicemen, and we went to stay under this flight of stairs, my little sister Vanessa and myself, and my mother put my sister Donna with a friend to stay. But we witnessed my mother being beaten. We witnessed very sad times the place under the flight of stairs at the pictures in my book, only about two or three FT from us. People used to wash their clothes, wash their utensils, their children. It was like a proper communion area. And my father got better after many months and came and took us to a proper place where we lived in Islam, in this little room eight by ten FT, and there was hardly any electricity, hardly any water. We felled, we filled water from a tube. Well, and to just give you a general idea of the Slam Marcus, approximately three thousand people shared three toilets and that's where they grew up. All of us have had tragic accidents, just like little children faced today. We got up in the morning and we saw dead babies on dustbinds. That's how we grew up. My little sister fell down a manhole and was just about saved by my dad. My other little sister got burnt on hot goals right up to her ribs. Weep. Were all very, very tiny and we just had to make do with what we had. And my father had a job very far away, so you had to leave very early in the morning. My mother used to go out in search of food or whatever she could get, and on Fridays the sisters of charity used to come to all the poor areas. One of the areas was usked, and they used to give away these packets of biscuits, a bag of powdered milk and a packet of clothes if you were lucky. If you were lucky there. And so mother Theresa one day came there to check on all her branches. And the work of this is as we're doing, and we were all in the queue. Sometimes you had to queue up for six hours and eight hours at a time in order to just make get something from them. And she just patted us on the cheek and said next, next, next, you know, go, go along. That's the first time I ever met Mother Teresa, and we just took our big of powdered milk and our clothes that we were lucky, and we used to come home and in that big of clothes were, you know, these giant Panties of ladies from America or UK or whatever, who used to send those clothes back to Calcaa. But we used to put on those panties. They used to start at our at our waist, and end at our ankles, but we used to tour around the whole area with those panties because we were so proud we had nickels after so long, and my father used to see us from work and say get inside Youtube. But that's how we grew up. We grew up with many lessons, abject poverty. We lost very many siblings Um, but that's really in just the story.

A Wow, ladies and gentlemen, talk about a woman who has seen so much that has endured so much poverty, so much death, so much disease, talking about people trying to kidnap her sister, to living on any steps and all these things, and she was able to make it out of that situation and she's now doing some amazing things in her career and she's helping so many people get to a place of decency, get to a place of being able to provide for themselves the best way they can. Can you talk all it's a little bit more about the work you're doing today. And then how did you end up winning an award of what I would call the most prestigious woman of our error and mother terrace? Like, when you think about purity, you think about heavily, you think about, you know, just, you know, humanity, you think about just giving and caring. That's the first person I mean, mat of fact, when I do my speech I talk about leadership. Are People that serve a cause greater than themselves. Dr Martintha King Jr, Nelson Mandela, Mother Teresa, like I say her name in many speeches because when I think of her, I think of humanitarian, leader, giver. And talk about how you end up winning an award for being a mother, Teresa Award winning recipient Marcus, I have from a little girl I was my mother. Anybody was highly charitable. She would take any man, woman and child off the streets and bring them into this little room to stay with us. And we used to actually sleep in one line, you know, back to back with each other, because the room was tiny and there were so many of us. But in that room she used to bring she used to keep words and she used to keep cats and my father used to call it nose Ark Really, but she just wanted to help everyone. She used to bring and she's to bring this this man who used to look terrible, off the street and she would say he's staying with us. And we used to say, mom, be your old girls, you can't just bring a strange man off the street and make him stay in this room with us. And she used to say we'll ask your father when he comes home. And when my father used to come home, he used to say dad, please tell her she can't let this man stay, and my dad used to say children should be seen and not heard, so your mother's Word is fine and he will stay. So my parents were highly charitable people. They would just help anyone and when he used to have a bath marcus in our little room, in our little Veranda, and mother used to have to put a sheet over the plastic line so that the boys from the upstairs couldn't look at us having a bath, because it was a very tiny little brenda. And sometimes, when he used to be I think, this man...

...used to just enter and I used to say, mom, but I'm I'm bathing, you can't just enter like that. And my mom used to say, when you become Elizabeth Taylor, then you let me know. Until then, move on. Right, he's seen everything, he's a great guy, he's not going to look at you. Come on, get a grip, get a grip. Just because he's poor. Don't put him down. Come on, get a grip. My mother was like that, my parents were like that. They never ever let us think negatively. They always twisted every single negative aspect in our lives into something positive, marcus. And so for us, when I grew up, that's really what we saw and I was determined that I would go away help my family and I would come back and I would make sure that I would take as many people and help as many people with me with jobs, with their livelihoods, and that's why today the Tagline I have is helping people from every generation. When I got my first job at Bank of America, out of two D and fifty girls, I got the job and to two or three weeks ago I was doing an interview just like I'm doing an interview with today, with the world of theirs councils, and they were so taken up with the story about Bank of America and how I got the job there and what I went through that only today, Bank of America I have contacted me and invited me back to Charlotte Uh for a very special event just because of what I had gone what I have gone through. But when I got the job at Bank of America, I worked really hard and then I came here and I worked very hard here in the Bank of America. I picked up many awards, but I was determined to go back because I truly believe Mark's that success is not just about getting through yourself, but it is about remembering to take others with you. That is true leadership. That's what I believe, and my parents every day, when they used to kiss us at the door and say we'll see you in the evening. We never had the Internet, we never had phone, we never had any means of contracting them, but my father always used to call us his little leaders. Used to say you all are the elder ones, so you leave the little ones and you show them how strong you could be. Sometimes we used to be left with no money at all and the poorest of the poor used to give us bad potato center marches that we used to cut off and cook. The meat man used to keep dried bones for us. The milkman gave me the milk that saved my sister's life, and we used to come back sometimes, my little sister and I send they used to come back covered in ash because we used to dig out their fires, take all the ash through it to the Dustbin and probably run from the tea shot to the dustbin like times to empty that big clay oven. But we used to come back covered in ash and the two little ones, Neil and Susan, they used to look at us and be laughing, but we used to come back with our hands with, you know, glebes and Samosas and whatever food the tea shot man had given us, and we used to always say to them don't worry, we're fine, we are not hungry. You'll eat it,...

...just like my mom used to do under the stairs when she used to bring back a career of two pieces of meat with some gradient, one little routine. She used to say, you'll eat it, because my friends have kept me too much and we learned from home and we did just that. So for me, that's what leadership is all about, that's what success is all about. H fantastic. So let me ask you this question when it comes to the work you're doing today, right, you again. You've been recognized for winning the award. You've done a lot of work with humanitarian you've gone back to any given back. You have really helped people of all ethnicities, all genders, all faces of life, like you said, helping all the generations. Right. What is it about helping people that gives you your most fulfillment in your work life? A lot of time, I feel people like you who are just natural born givers. It's something innate in them internally that lights their fire about helping as many people as they can. And I want you to talk us because right now, Jillian people that are listening to this episode, theyven. I even know they may just need to hear your words, like they may need. Need to hear what you've done and why you do it. Because with the pandemic, with inflation, with covid nineteen still wearing his head, with, you know, people losing loved ones and all these different things, people, I feel, just need to hear positivity and you're somebody and I know your story. Think of your work. It just screams positivity. So what is it that gives you the most fulfillment about helping others and why? That's a great question. Thank you. Um what gives me the most fulfillment is a tremendous amount of in a satisfaction and fulfillment, and I say this because there is no greater joy and there is there are there is no greater way to cry tears of happiness when I wake up. I wake up every single day at four thirty in the morning and I trained the girls on Zoom in India and we have beautition centers and schools, we have secretarial schools, we have English language schools for young girls who literally have no hope at all. We have little girls who are twelve years old and they work in three people's houses and they have cancer, but they have to work in three people's houses to pay for their own cancer treatment. We have little girls who in even in our little room when I was growing up, there's one little shelf where you know you keep all your precious belongings, and when they climb up on that shelf, their two kneys get caught in the fan and they die in front of their young siblings. There are little ones who have had the most terrible accidents and they have no hope at all.

They are little ones who uh basically from the ages of six months to big girls and big boys who are stuffed and lived in one tiny little room with as vest cheating. There are little girls who are raped, their little girls who are suffering with so many diseases. There are boys like that, and I feel great when I wake up in the morning at both thirteen. Sometimes I haven't slept and I've got so much of my own work to do, but I wake up and I put zoom on and I get these smiling places of good morning man like that and I feel, Oh my God, everything is so worth it, because I take them. Some girls come in their marcus and they can't even lift their heads when they first come to the center and then after a year you have to see them. They are going out on my behalf two different little little places and delivering speeches. They are speaking up for others, they're helping other girls. We then give them employment. We hire them as beauticians, as teachers, as trainers, as administration staff, and every time you ask them what is it you want in your life, they'll say, man, just help my family, just give my little child a chance. And when you give people that chance and you save a life, it is I cannot describe the feeling to you, Marcus. It is unimaginable and it is so fulfilling that I would I would give anything up in my life to just go back there and live there, because that is where I belong. I live here in the UK and I always say to people I live here, but my heart and my soul is definitely there, or with anywhere in the world where there are people poor and suffering. That is where I belong. Jillian, you know we me Doucers, our listeners are so grateful that you took time to come on our show because you are the inspiration. Your story is the reason. The theme of our show authenticity, amazing people with amazing stories and our show is fast paced, growing. It really is and we're so fortunate for that. But at the heart of the manner why we start this was not for ratings, not for listeners. It was bringing people authentic, amazing, inspiring stories of people just like you. I have one final question. What is a famous mother Teres a quote that you like to live by? I've seen so many, but I would love to know from you what's a famous mother terracer quote that you live...

...and embody your life after? Well, I think Marcus. She said if you are humble, nothing will touch you, neither praise nor disgrace, because you know what you are and who you are. So continue to be humble. Ladies and Gentlemen, Dah Jillian has them. Mother terrace a war recipient, winner, amazing individual, amazing philanthropists. She's somebody that I truly have a ton of respect for and let me tell you, the authentic tip of the day. Always be humble, always be grateful. When you live your life in gratitude, nothing can touch you, neither praise nor disgrace, because you're confident in who you are. Again, this was special episode. Number were twelve of the get authentic with Marcus, show with Jillian Haslum, an amazing woman with an amazing story and the heart of gold that is always trying to help and inspire others. Thank you, Jolynne, for joining us. Amazing Story Again, episod number twelve. Mrs Marcus Ogden, thank you tuning in and have a great day. m.

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