Get Authentic with Marques Ogden
Get Authentic with Marques Ogden

Episode 7 · 3 weeks ago

Get Authentic with Marques Ogden - Robert Blase

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Marques speaks with Robert Blase

Yea. Welcome back everybody to be get authenticed with Marcus show. I'm your host, Marcus outen. We are so excited day to airbew one of my great friends, one of our sponsors, Robert Blaze. Let's talk about that for a second. ROB IS WITH LUX DENVER. He is a realtor in the Denver market does a lot of great things. He's working with some professional athletes, with people that are trying to buy a home, sell a home, and he has a ton of experience and how to navigate the waters of what is usually the biggest and most emotional purchase of someone's life, their home, their dream home. So again, welcome to the show my good friend Robert Blaze. Robert, thanks for joining us here an episode number four. Thank you very much, Marcus. It's an honor. I appreciate the invite. Awesome, awesome, Robert. Everybody knows first question we ask every guest. What does the word authentic slash authenticity mean to you? That's such a good question and it's fitting for you. Having met you back in I could tell immediately how authentic you were and you haven't changed today since then. To me, authenticity or being authentic means being yourself, but being consistent with that. So everybody has a different belief all across the board. We all believe in different things. That's what makes humans amazing. But how you act and interact with people, or how you do your job or how you teach your kids, as long as you're being consistent and being yourself and not trying to be somebody you aren't, I believe that will get you further in life. So that's what authenticity means to me. Fantastic, you know what I love. Let's get real from them a lady and Gentlemen, I love how Robert said we are all different, we are all human beings and there's only one of us, so we have to be sure that we are being our authentic, true self. Robert, can you talk us a little bit about your background, where you're from, education and kind of fill us in on who is Robert Blaze? That's a great question, Marcus. It all started on a snowy day back in nineteen seventy five when I was born on the side of the road in a blizzard, in the floor of a car Um. That's no joke. That's uh, that's kind of a little fun tidbit about me. But uh, you know, I was excited to get into this world, I guess, and Uh, I've been running ever since. Um, yeah, I grew up in a small town in South Dakota, very small town. I had about twenty eight kids in my graduating class, town of about six hundred people. Started working when I was twelve years old. I think the owners kind of felt bad for me. I would throw these little rocks inside of a pool and uh, they would say, Robert, you gotta go get those rocks. You can't be throwing nobody was in the pool, but I was throwing them in there because I knew I could go swim for free. Finally, when I was about twelve, they're like you just come work and so, of course, you know, back then I'm old. So back then it was a little bit different. Parents had to sign off that you could do that and I just started hauling luggage off of tour buses for older people doing a traveling around the country with Greyhound and uh,...

Hill City was one of their stops and uh, you know, I started working on ice twelve and I think that work ethic has been instilled in me for the rest of my life. And Uh, you know, I moved on. I stayed in hospitality through college. I went to college in a small town in South Dakota as well. I was a runner. Um, I was actually a really good runner. Um. I think I ran about a two six marathon, two hours twenty six minutes. Uh, I was training for the Olympic trials and I didn't quite make it. My body started to break down. And then, uh, I had met my wife in college and then we reconnected after her car accident about eighteen years ago, and uh, I moved to Arizona and I started working in mortgages, not really understanding what was going on back then. Um, my wife and I ended up, you know, we ended up getting closer after her car accident. We ended up getting married and then, uh, back in the two thousand eight Um, you know, life slapped us in the face. Where a young couple married, waiting for our first baby, and UH ended up losing my job, which I never ever thought would happened. But it was the company that started to fold and uh, you know, I never thought I was gonna be one to lose my job. You never think that. Sometimes you think you're invincible, no matter what industry or business you're in, or you know, if you're an athlete or whatever. Sometimes we have that invincible feeling Um. And so the company was not as hard of a worker as I was, I say, and they went under. And so my wife and I, we ended up losing a couple of kids, we lost our jobs, we lost our house, we lost cars. We're just one of the story of millions of people out there. Everybody back then was in the same position. Some people lost multiple houses, multiple kids, multiple cars, multiple jobs. So it's not I feel sorry for me moment, it's a learning moment. And Uh, I decided after that. I bounced around a little bit, trying to stay on my feet as best as I could. My wife and I moved back to Colorado. Long Story Short, I was able to decide that I wanted to become a real estate agent, and the reason why that it was so passionate for me was I don't want anybody else to go through what my wife and I went through. We overextended when we bought we didn't stick to our budget. Our real estate agent at the time Great Guy, but he didn't educate us. He didn't tell us some things that we had no clue on. We had to learn the hard way. And so when I work with clients, no matter if they're athletes or their teachers or whoever, I try to make sure they're sticking with their budget and they understand what could happen or what could come up down the line and educate them the best way I can without, you know, being too over the top. And Uh, you know, I just don't want anybody to go through what my wife and I went through, because there's a lot of marriages that would not have survived and I'm very blessed to have her in my back pocket and helping me out and coaching me and guiding me, as well as you, uh, doing the same thing. So I'm a very blessed man and and Um, I wouldn't trade my life for anybody's audience. Let's get real for a moment. Robert talked about a lot of things that a lot of people wouldn't share, his trials, his tribulations, what he went through, the laws, oh eight, the homes, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera. And Again, Ladies and gentlemen, this is what the get authentic with Marcus. Show is all about real people with real human stories. Robert talked about his wife and how she was really by his side the entire time, and that right there is the true definition of authenticity. It's staying beside someone and being real and honest and raw with them when they need you the...

...most. And that, ladies and gentleman, is what our show is all about. So, Robert, tell everybody a little bit now what you're doing in the real tre market. And again you work with some professional athletes, and let me, I'm gonna go ahead and shine a light on Robert. Rob Really did something really special that people don't want to do today, and I feel well, some people do, but a lot of people don't. The hard work. Robert ended up working with a professional uh team and throughout showing patients show in consistency, showing focus, did a lot of work for free, and he ended up turning that into selling a home for almost four million dollars because he was authentic, he was real and he said, Ladies and Gentlemen, I'm gonna do what is necessary to help our clients see that I'm not about the transactions, I'm about the relationship building. Robert Talking that in that regard. Okay, sure, so, about eight years ago I became licensed as a real estate agent. Um. A lot of people know your story, Marcus. Um. They don't know that. Um, several years after two thousand eight, my wife and I ended up having a file for bankruptcy and by in doing so, the bankruptcy attorney we hired, they kind of mixed some things up that they weren't, you know, in our file that they shouldn't have. We didn't own a boat, but all of a sudden there's a picture of a boat in there. So instead of doing a thirteen where we kind of wipe the slate clean, we ended up doing a chapter three, Um, or chapter seven, excuse me. We ended up doing a third team where we had to pay monthly, and so that was kind of the beginning. I was just getting into the real estate we had these escalating payments and, as you know or may not know, when you become a real estate and it's really hard are to get business, really hard. And so I made the decision day one that the one group I wanted to help no matter what, was professional athletes. Um. I was a really good athlete. I had met several athletes over the years. Um. I don't really get star struck and I really just I don't want anything from them other than to help them in any way I can. So about seven years ago, while we're still in the middle of this bankruptcy, I decided I'm going to walk into coors field and I'm gonna walk in there and ask if I can help any of the athletes with their rentals. I want no tickets, no autographs, I don't want any merchandise, I want nothing from them. If I get paid, it would be through the company that I refer to the baseball player to Um in exchange. The only thing I said that I wanted was if any of them were to buy I want an opportunity to interview for that job. I don't want the job given to me, I want to interview for it. If I can't win that interview, then that's on me, that's not on the rockies. But I still want to help them try to find places to live during the season. So fast forward seven years. I've helped several players, many of whom aren't here anymore. Some have been signed with other teams, many have retired and I've helped several that are still here and they're just repeat clients that called me every January we start the process. I'm also licensed in Arizona, so I sometimes I even go out there and help them find places to live out in Arizona as well, and so that relationship has really been built on trust. And Uh, there's one thing that you mentioned to me back in twenty nine team markets, and I have to give you props to this and I hope it helps somebody else out there. The one thing that you told me to do, and I've lived this moment day in and day out, no matter who I'm working with, it's make the invisible visible. So if you're doing something as a real estate agent, most people don't realize how much behind the scenes work we have to do. They don't understand that we might just be working from, you know, nine to five, like most people, but yet we...

...put the kids to bed and we do our sports and all that. From ten o'clock to midnight or one o'clock, we're behind the scenes right and contracts, researching homes or whatever whatever the case is. I don't get paid for rentals with these athletes, I don't get paid a time, but what I do get paid in is their trust and that means more to me than anything so fast forward to this year. I get a call saying hey, we're out in Arizona, we want to buy a home and we want to be moved in by the time we get there. Okay, that's a lot of pressure because they're not here and they want me to look at these homes and I said what's your budget? And they said, well, we're anywhere up to five million. If needbe, we could probably extend if we needed to. I said don't extend, it's not worth it. There's deals out there, but if you're buying something of that magnitude, I really want you to see it. You know. They agreed and they said okay, well, we'll fly up if we see anything. I said what I do from my athletes. Never worked with this athlete, by the way, never and so it was very interesting to be a part of that journey with them. They heard about me through teammates and they didn't interview anybody else. They went right to me and said we trust you because of all the work you've done in the last several years. We know who you are. Your name is in that locker room. Talk about talk about a trust builder right there. So we go through and we look at homes and we look at homes and, uh, they were like, man, you were right, some of these homes are really close together or they don't have all the things that we're looking for. And I kept telling them patients will pay off, just be patient. They ended up buying in an area that was kind of at the back of their list. Um, but I still showed them some homes there just to be you know, kind of keep that open mind, mindedness. It's more private. Yes, it's a little higher price than some aspects, but the list of items that they wanted, you could find the home there and we ended up finding one and we had to compete. Marcus, believe this or not, they moved, they were here. They already living in the AIRBNB. You know, they passed spring training. They were patient, they sen to me, uh, and they had to compete with seven other offers and the property was listed at three point two million dollars. That's how hard our hot our market was in April. And so when an athlete has money and they say we're just tell us what we need to offer, that's a lot of pressure. How would you handle it if you had that, you know, Opportunity? My job is not to spend my client's money. But my job is to advocate for my clients and make sure that I'm protecting their best interests, protecting their privacy and let the let the athlete drive the bus. As far as what can I say? What can't I say? How are you taking title? I educated them on a trust or an LLC, making sure that they didn't take it in their name. In case he becomes a big star, we don't want people or fans trying to find out who they are. So I educated them. I talked to their financial visors, their lender, everybody was involved, a sports agent. We came up with the LLC that doesn't show their names. Um, it just worked out beautifully. They allowed me to, or they wanted me to, tell the sellers who they were, why they were bidding what they were um in the entire process. Yes, it was a learning curve. It was a learning experience for me. Reverses renting. Now you're helping somebody buy. But it was the easiest transaction I've ever been a part of. It was the most fun transaction I've ever been a part of. All sides had the same goal. Let's have the sellers work for the buyers. The buyers work for the sellers. The lender work with us, the agents. Her and I worked together great. I totally want to do another deal with her. She was an amazing real estate agent. She just got it and I think all parties just had a lot of fun on that transaction. Audience. Let's get real. I took several notes from what Robert is saying, but the one that I...

...wanted to share with you because he kept saying that word. I think it was at least four, if not five times. Trust. Trust. Trust is built by these three things competency, reliability, having your clients best interests. And I also love what rob said. It's not his job to spend his client's money. A lot of realtors are gonna always try to win out. A lot some realtors is put in that regard, will try to get the highest priced property to be able to get the highest commission check. Robert is not like that. He is authentic, he is real, he cares about people and what they need and what they want from him. Is a real realtor who is what I call a collaborative partner. He is not a vendor and he has built his business off of that. Foundational Building Block and that's why he is so successful and what he does today. Now, Rob Talk to us about how important is for people to understand the housing marketing and what's going on right now. A lot of people are stressed out, a lot of things happening, a lot of things going on and people are like, Oh my God, should I buy now and trades keep rising? Should I wait it out? You know, what does that look like? And here is an expert in the industry that can tell you exactly what he's seeing forecasting to help give you great information on how to authentically do what it's best for you. Robert. You know, that's a really good question and I think it comes down to each individual. As I said earlier in the podcast, each individual is unique, that every individual has a different need or a want, and I think what they have to understand is if you're buying a house, it's not a short term, get rich quick thing. What we've seen in that's an anomaly. Never happened in history ever with covid with people buying homes at quick that much, you know the value is going up that much. That's never happened. Typically, what you see in a ten year span on average is an equity of about five point six per cent within a ten year range. Even in Oh eight we still average at least five point six per in that decade. So if you think about it, do you want to rent? Can You buy right now? Some people cannot, Marcus. The interest rates have pushed them to the point they cannot buy. Some people are saying, I'M gonna wait for interest rates to come down. Okay. Is that because you think you're going to get another two in a straight, or is it because you don't want the higher payment? Or is it because you're waiting for the market to crash? There's a lot of things that have to happen for the market to crash. One, you have to have an influx of homes on the market. We do not have that. We have an increase right now, but we're nowhere near where the levels were in two thousand eight. Nowhere near that. We also have a lot of jobs available. Right now we have eleven million jobs available. Back in a wait we had two million. So it's a lot different right now. So I think you have to ask yourself if you're out there contemplating whether you want to buy, do you want to buy because it's an investment on your future, or do you want to rent because it's the easy thing to do? Do you want to invest in your future? I bought in because I saw a ten year plan for us. My boys will be going to college at that point. I don't have a savings my money is tied up in my home and I've doubled my money in two years. It's an investment. Will you...

...double your money in two years if you buy today? Likely not, but will you make maybe ten percent on what you did? Probably between five and ten percent is not bad if you're investing in that and it's your own house. You don't buy a house just to buy a house. Usually, unless you're investing in renting, you buy a house to make it a home for your family. I wanted to buy a home. I had to go through all that bankruptcy crap in order to be able to buy again as a first time homebuyer. Okay, it was an amazing experience. Again, I wouldn't trade all that experience for anything, because now I can educate my clients on what not to do. Don't follow in my footsteps. Stick to your budget. If you can afford to buy, even at six percent is not a bad interest rate. That's where they were maybe and the market was still hot. If you remember back then. They're not going to go up to like they did in the eighties. Six percent is not bad and if they do come down now, you can refinance out of it and get a lower interest rate at that time down the line if you need to. Maybe you're buying a home that isn't perfect, but down the line the rates come down and you're able to take a little money out to fix those things. So I think everybody has a different need and a different want and I think each individual in this country needs to ask do I need a home because I just want to be like everybody else, or do I really need a home so I can invest in my future? You know, rob the real thing I took from that is that you, as the buyer, need to do what's best for you right because again, rent is going to continue to rise and rise and rise. That's the way it is. Again, interest rates, from what we're seeing, are going to continue to rise. Now doesn't mean they can't go down, doesn't mean that they won't go to hew, but what it means is you have to be prepared for them. To continue to go up because of what we're seeing with the economy, with gas prices, with food prices, with transportation issues, logistic issues, and again, this is why we have this podcast. People like Robert are really understanding what's going on, what's the trajectory and how we can help people that are listening to our podcast gain as much knowledge, as much perspective, as much information to get them to where they need to be. So, Robert, as we already close out this amazing interview, okay, what is one piece of advice you would give to a fire or seller right now, based upon what you've seen, to make them feel that if they have made a decision to buy yoursell move forward with it. If they've not, move forward with that, but don't be what I call wishy washy, because I feel if you're doing that, then you're not really going to get or do what is really entitled or what is really set for you to do with your journey. That's that's really good. I think each if you're a buyer or a seller, there's a couple of different things. One, if you're a buyer right now, I think the biggest thing you can do, if I can tell anybody this. It's stick to your budget. Have your budget. Everybody knows what their budget is. I tell my clients all the time, Marcus, I don't care what you're pre approved for. That means absolutely nothing to me. What means the most to me is if we go and look at a home and you fall in love with it, I try to run an estimated number right there on an APP that I have from a title company and I try to figure out what's The h away, what are the taxes? What's the insurance estimated going to be? What your principle and interest? What does that look like...

...as a monthly payment? In a ballpark figure? If it's something that you cannot afford, let's move on. Is it heartbreaking? Sometimes it can be, but we need to stick to your budget because nobody knows what the future holds. And if there's one thing I learned back then, even though I feel like I was the hardest worker in that building, I'd show up at two am, I leave at eight PM. Yes, I said that right, two am to eight PM. I was a top producing account manager in the company. I still lost my job. It didn't matter. We don't know what the future holds for us. If we did, as sure as heck wouldn't be selling real estate. I'd have a crystal ball sitting on a beach somewhere. But if you're a buyer, stick to your budget. Make sure that the person you hire to represent you as your real estate agent has your best interest at hand. There's a lot of companies out there, a lot of agents out there. I get their clients because they don't have their client's best interest at hand. Do Your due diligence, interview them. It's your Cho Place. You can interview as many lenders and as many real estate agents as you want. It is your right as a consumer to do that. For a seller, you may not get top dollar anymore. That's just the way it is. Will you still make a profit? Absolutely. Price it right. It is an emotional process to sell a home. Why? Because every one of us thinks our home is unique and special and it's the best home out there, and by Golly it is for you. It is the best home for you. You've done all the work to it, you've done all the updates, you've done all the hard work to it, you've done all the cleaning to it. It is your home. It is the best home, but hiring a real estate agent who knows the market, knows the changes and sees every day what's going out there and can prove the facts and the numbers to you. Why are you listing it lower than my neighbor Tom's? Have an answer for that? Because Tom's is a single family yours is a two story. That's why it's not as desirable in this area. You're on a busy street, he's not. He's across the street. All those things matter to a buyer. So if you price it right, you'll get your money, but if you price too high, you might let it sit and then you're frustrated. Make sure your agent, if they tell you something, you listen to it and take it with a grain of salt. It's not personal, it's a business and that's where the emotional part of being a seller really can sometimes get a little over the line, if you will, because it is such an emotional process. We want you to make your money. We want you to be there and and be successful and getting top dollar in your neighborhood. It's not always going to happen and you need somebody to tell you the truth and you'll be okay with that. Ladies and Gentlemen, my Great Friend Coaching Client, Robert Blaze. He is a sponsor Lutz Denver of the get authentic with Marcus Shell. He has a ton of knowledge, he knows his stuff and he's all about the best interest for us clients. Hit him up. You saw US email come across the screen. And before we close out, Robert, how can people get in touch with you? If they like to connect with you and reach out to you, they can always visit my website, Robert Blaze Dot com, and that's Robert B L A S E, even though it sounds like a Z, and then you can call me or text me seven to zero, six, zero, zero nine, zero three five, or you can email me at Robert at Lux Denver, and that's L U X DENVER DOT COM. I work with a ton of real estate agents all across the country. I interview them, I vet them for you. I try to find the best person to refer you to if you don't have one. I can help pretty much anybody nationwide, and I'm also licensed in Arizona and Colorado. Love It, Ladies and gentlemen, my great friend and client, Robert Blaze of Lux Denver again everybody...

...you can listen to to get authentic with market show and the authentic tip to leave you with. Build your relationships on trust. When people trust you, they'll go to backfield. Thanks for tuning in. Have a great dea.

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