Get Authentic with Marques Ogden
Get Authentic with Marques Ogden

Episode 53 · 2 weeks ago

Get Authentic with Marques Ogden- Patrick Yanke

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

My professional life has spanned both public and private sectors; military and civilian cultures; spiritual and temporal matters. In all of them, one key focus is important: “remember who you serve.” I believe that most problems in this world would disappear if we would just keep our purpose foremost in our minds… our purpose is to serve. The challenge is to recognize who is served in every decision we make.

In this inspiring interview, Marques talks with Patrick about the amazing work he is doing as a keynote speaker, author and successful entrepreneur.  Patrick speaks on a multitude of topics like leadership, faith, resilience and much more!  This interview will inspire you to achieve new heights.  To check out more of our episodes, please click the link Marques Ogden | Keynote speaker - Executive Coach

Yeah, yeah, Hello everyone, and welcome to the episode number fifty one of the Get Authentic with Marcus Schell. I'm your host, Marcus Anton and today we're joined about my amazing friend and client, Mr Patrick Yankee. Before bringing Patrick up to the stage, I want to thank a few of our amazing sponsors. Head Start Equity owned by Brian Head, a real estate multi family investment firm San Antonio, Texas, Canadate a Hint brand on North Carolina, Lux Denver, a Real Trip brand out of Denver, Colorado, Power Plus Mouthguard a Mouthguar brand out of the Detroit, Michigan area. Stout Franchise a Biases out of the Shop North Carolina area. And Ace Realty Group, a Real Trip brand out the Rock, North Carolina area. Now I's going up to the stage my good friend Mr Patrick Yankee. Patrick, how are you doing today, sir? I'm an outstanding day. How about gee, Marcus doing well? I love the back drop, very nature as very scenic, so every day looks great. Man appear in the mountains today, it's just it's a gorgeous day. Nice nice, nice well. Patrick. Before we get started with your interview, can you tell our audience what does the word authentic slash authenticity mean to Patrick Yankee? Generally it means unique, means, Um, I'm not trying to be all things to all people, but being genuinely who you are and who you are is unique in this world. If more people try to actually be authentic, you'd find that there's a lot more variety in the world, a lot more diversity, as as people like to call for diversity today. Um, people just didn't stop trying to be like everyone else and being envious of what everyone else has and just be themselves. And I think you find a lot more authenticity in the world. I'm sure. Let's get real for a second. Love how you said, if people will stop being envious of others, be a much better world. People say I want more of this, I want more of that, more money, more fame. Just be okay with who you are and don't try to live a life what I call external motivating factors, money, fame though to write, all those things don't make you a better person. So I love how you said, if people stop being envious, it would be a much better world. Patrick, talk to us a bit about who you are, what you're doing, your client of mine, You do a lot working financial pic you're also a keynote speaker. Talk to us all about who is Patrick Yank. But questions like that being so open ended, you always wonder where to begin. Um So, I guess beginning with my upbringing. I'm the son of a police officer and a doctor, both on shift work growing up, so spend a lot of time in a way, raising myself for these along with my siblings. We get ourselves up in the morning, ready for school. We'd go to school, ride our bikes to school, come home in the afternoon, typically on our own recognizance, let ourselves into the house. Uh do our school work whatever it needs to be done. Parents to show up eventually, and uh So, I spent a lot of time growing up taking care of ourselves. All that was before the age of ten. Um So, so I guess I would start with I'm very independent, um very very self motivated. I like to see the world the way the world is meant to be, not necessarily the way I wanted to be, but the way it's it's actually meant to be. Um So, that's the lens...

...that I tend to see things. Uh. I went to the Air Force Academy my desire was to be a pilot UM, but the world changed things changed for me as well. I graduated from the academy at the time when they're cutting back on pilots instead of adding to them at the the end of the Gulf War, So it became more of a business manager in the Air Force. But a lot of that training that came out of being a business manager has been very helpful to me in the ways that in my life now. I found that God has really prepared me for every step of the way that I've taken along the way, UM, And so I guess another key factor to who I am is very faith filled. I found that God has been there every every step of the way, and I couldn't have done what I've done without Him. And I trust that whatever I'm going through today is preparing for me for whatever comes next. You know, Patrick, you know you talked about your faith learning business in the military. How did being a business manager in the military prepare for who you are today? And what is it that you're doing today. I know a little bit more about Scott and friends with you and coaching for several years, but people that I don't know you, what are you doing today and how did your prior career in the military helped to shape you to who you are today. Well, one thing I learned in the military is that I love public speaking. Um, I've always been fairly good at it. The actually MC at the Talent Show when I was in grade school and got the wonderful response from the people that although they love the Talent Show, they cut to me afterwards and said what a great job I did as MC. Uh. So, that's something that just kind of taught me at an early age, that being on stage with a microphone and something I enjoy. Being in the Air Force, I found a similar response. One of my jobs, I was chief of advertising and promotions across the Southeast region for recruiting, and oftentimes I would go and visit with a recruiter and and say, Hey, come on with me, We're gonna go visit this high school. And we get to that high school and there's some sort of convicttion going on with all the kids gathered in the in a gymnasium, and he hanced me on microphone and says, can you say something to them? Well, yeah, yes I can, And so I talked to talk to the kids. I love impromptu speaking. In fact, that's my favorite thing to do. You know, typically when you get up in front of somebody, you want to have something to say so you can go with you prepared remarks. But my favorite part is really the questions and answers, the time when I can think on my feet and answer questions and and really just be spontaneous. So my Air Force time really prepared me. Uh in many ways. I talk about the business side of things. My initial job in the Air Force wasn't in recruiting, was actually in charge of a lot of service functions, so food service, fitness, lodging, libraries, mortary. Affair is based on our guard When I talk about things functioning the way they're meant to function, uh, those are attributes to go very well with all of those things because they have a certain way that they have to function to make them work. In a military environment. Um, yes, there are a business but most of those business are meant not to make money but to ride zero. So if you're making money, then you find that the troops find that they're going to get fed very well this evening because we need to spend some of that money. And if you're following behind then the troops find that the Okay, suddenly we're back on pork and beans. What happened? You know? But but but but you learned to to manage the money. But in managing the money, you know, one of the biggest things you do is you're you're managing the people that have been put under your care, but you're also managing the material that's been put under your care. And in trying to, you know, make budgets for the next year. What do we need? We need new equipment? Do we need new facilities? And in all of that, you have to remember that the numbers. One most important thing is remembering who you serve. As a military person, I'm serving the taxpayers. This is their dollars and for my dollars too. Don't get me wrong, but but a very small amount came for me. Most of it came from everybody else. Is you got to be a good steward of what's been entrusted to you and remember who it is you're serving. And that follows me. Where I am know and everything that I do,...

I try to remember who it is I'm serving. And if it's a religious environment, the ultimately I'm serving God. But but I've got customers as well, people that hire me to speak, people that hired me to do any number of things. Remember that who it is that I'm serving in the scenario, and make sure that I'm meeting the needs of the people that have hired me. So, Patrick, let's expand upon that. You said, the people that hire you for your speaking talk about that. Like you do a lot of keynotes speaking on leadership and faith, but leadership has been the one that you really enjoy the most. You'll do faith and you do a great job at it. But you know, Patrick, You've always talked about serving those that have entrusted you with their business. I your speaking clients, your consulting clients, you know, coming to the table and bringing that wholehearted message with specific action steps based off some of your ideologies that you've been through from the military and from your professional career, from your family life. Talk to as about your keynote speaking and some things that you'd like to speak on, and why sure, a lot of it does come from that military background. UM I actually went to basic training twice. I guess I'm a glutton for punishment. UM I tried to go to the Air Force Academy. I didn't get in my first try, and so I went to a military junior college as prep school for the academy to try again. So I went to Fort Knox for Basic UH, and then when I was accepted the Air Force Academy, I went to the Air Force Academy for another basic UM. But one thing I learned between those UM is UH a service level of leadership. You know, in the in the Army, when it's time to bed people down, when it's time to feed people, you're taking care of your people first. UM. You have to take care of the lowest private on up to the corporals and the rest. To make sure that the people that you that you're taking care of are taking care of first. So if there's a child line, you're last in line. If there's a betting down to be done, you're betting down everybody. Then you go and take care of yourself. That's the Army model leadership. When I get to the Air Force, I find some somewhat different level of leadership where there's a lot of things are focused on the pilot in the cockpit, and the pilot in the cockpit tends to be an officer, so it seems like a little bit more of like the gloryo side of things. But there is a logic to it though, you know, because when when you've got an air crew, let's say you've got a C five and you've got the pilots and you've got the other parts of the crew that they're the enlisted. When they get there, the officers are making sure the enlisted are bedded down. The officers are going to get their crew rest, and the lists are going to do their thing. They'll meet back up on the airplane tomorrow and they'll go do their thing. So there's a little bit different focus, but what I found is that there's actually a very common focus between them. You have to take care of your war fighters. In the army, your war fighters are the guys in the trenches. You make sure you take care of them. In the Air Force, your warfighters are tend to be the SU's in the cockpit. So as a business person we have to remember that. As a leader, you have to remember that to take care of your warfighters. The people that have contact with your mission have contact with your customers. So what I want to speak about his servant leadership, because we get this image of like sergeant army, you know in the UH in these uh like full metal jacket and that sort of thing. They're dressing. They're dressing down the privates and they're they're they're yelling in their face. And we think that that's the way the military leadership is. It's it's it's just the belittling people. But that's not really true. More it's uh, it's like William Penn, no man is to fit the command another who cannot command himself. So the first thing is that the military is very good at sharing their culture. So they're bringing people in with a common experience. A marine that comes in through Camp Lejeune, that goes through Paris Island, a marine is a marine, and they had that common experience of having gone to Paris Island, so they understand each other. The same thing with the Air Force. When you go through basic training, we go through the same things we go through the Army. You go through the same things...

...in basic training. And a business can look at that in terms of sharing the culture with people that come in, knowing what it is they're joining, understanding the language and the unique culture of the organization you're going into. The military is very good at that. But if you're going to be a leader, you have to recognize that your first job is replacing, is training your replacement. So you're focused on the mission. Everything you do is focused on the mission. The mission is purpose, it's why you're here, It's why you got out of bed this morning. So you focus on the mission. But in focusing on the mission, you focus on the people who actually accomplished the mission. Again, your warfighters. So you have to take care of the people who take care of the mission. And how you take care of the people is recognizing that one they need all the training, support, everything they can get to take care of the mission. And two, you're not going to be there forever. Whether you get hired by another place, you can retire, whatever the case might be. You always you're your training your replacement. You have to train the leaders of tomorrow. So every speaker has to have their acronym when it comes to servant leadership, mine is the servant leader cares and the C is for communication. It starts with communication. You have to communicate the mission to people. You have to listen as they communicate back to you. Two way communication is key to leadership. Then you have to accompany them. And accompany them means you're in the trenches with them. You're experiencing what they're experiencing, and you have to set the example for what you expect from them. You want them to be early, You better be early. You expect them to continually continuously learn. You have to continuously learn. You have to set the example and be with them in that in that experience responsibility. You can't delegate get away your responsibility. The mission that doesn't get done, it's on you. But you have to be able to give people the responsibility they're ready for and hold them accountable. So you give that responsibility and you say this is your task to get done, and you allow them to do it. General Patton was quote quoted as saying, never tell people how to do something. Tell them what needs to be done, and they'll surprise you with your ingenuity. You as a leader, have to give people as much responsibility as they can handle to accomplish the mission as best that they can do their own abilities. And then you hold them accountable and you raise them up. And the first thing you do, by the way, is you don't kill the messenger if they make a mistake. Part of that accompanying is recognizing you make mistakes too, and if you're going to be able to make mistakes and recover, you have to allow them to make mistakes and recover. And one thing the leader should always know is someone who has made a mistake, who is honestly trying, is now your best employee because they haven't just found a way not to do something. What they've done is they've been better trained than everybody else on how to do the task. Now that you're going to get rid of them and train someone else, you're gonna start from ground zero to bring them back up to where that person was. So if you've got someone who honestly wants to accomplish the mission, does their best but fails, you recognize what you have in your hands right now is the best employee you have, and you raise them up beyond those mistakes. That's kind of responsibility. I mean, then you have to evolve. He is for evolve. We have to evolve the organization plan for the future, all the things the organization is going to need, the facilities plans, the marketing plans, all those sorts of things. But then you also have to evolve your people to help them grow and raise them up, identify the leaders of tomorrow, put people in positions of leadership that that correspond to their levels of ability, and recognize that your best leaders aren't just the ones who do the best tasks. We tend to promote people and say you're really good at this, so we're gonna put you in charge. Now. Your best leaders are the ones that inspire others. And if you're going to take the person who does the best with the mission and put them in a leadership position, train them to be a leader. We can't just assume they're a great leader because they're a great doer. So that's part of the evolution of our people is helping them grow, and we have a tendency not to allow that because if we help them grow, we might be training them for the next job. They might leave us. Well, that's that's life. Deal with it. Raise your people up anyway, and then the s is served. Once you've done all of that, now it's time to serve. They come to you and say I need your support, I need your help, I need you to do this. You're in the trenches with them. You're actually serving their needs so they can meet your customers needs. The most beautiful organization is when...

...the leader is the one behind the people serving the customers. You're serving them so they can serve others. So the servant leader cares. If you just do those those five things, you're gonna find that you'll you'll have a strong leadership position. And if you remember the acronym, then you're gonna have the basics right there, because if you care, you're gonna do those things. M ladies and gentlemen, let's get real for a moment. It's all about caring for those that you are serving when you are a leader. Again, leadership is not a title, it's not a privilege, is not an abuse of power. It's a responsibility to serve those that you are leading. Patrick, I have a question. Your acronym is phenomenon and I love acronyms. Who I have one, train and pivot and ego, and I think they are a great way to get your message across. Out of the acronym cares. Right. Let's say you have somebody's listening right now that knows their leadership style is not connecting with their team or with their individuals. Right, they need to hire Patrick as a speaker. But before they do that, and you say, you know what, Patrick, before you bring you in of the acronym cares, right, which would you say is the most important letter and why they should start with because again, you know, as far as I'll be passing someone struggling, having five things come at and at one time could be a lot, and they can get kind of like you know, they can get disengaged, they can get a little bit frustrated, they can get it's like, you know, what effort, I'm done, But what is the what is the one thing they should do first? Which letters should they try to implement and take action steps towards first? If they're a struggling leader doesn't even know where to start to get the ship going back in the right direction. But when I get my presentation, what you find is actually I put the letters around a core, and so the cares goes around the core. Because that's what you're supposed to be caring about. It is supposed to be caring about the mission and the people. And again mission is purpose. So the first thing that anybody, any leaders should do is to refocus on the mission. We tend to forget the mission over time, it tends to get caught. You know, the being counters come in and we started put working about the beans and not so much about the mission itself. There's a reason that business is there. There's a reason that organization is there. It has a core function and the core core purpose, and over time it tends to get lost with all of the other ancillary things that we do. If you're getting paid by the business, now you're worried about the financials of the business and making sure that that money flow keeps coming. So we tends to we tend to lose our focus. So I would say that the first thing that leaders should do if things are flagging in the organization, if we're not accomplishing we think we need to accomplish, or if people aren't focused in the right direction, getn't focused back on the mission. You yourself as a leader should be dedicated to that mission, and I mean dedicated to that mission. Focus everyone else back on the mission. So research and say, okay, why is this organization here, what is it we were meant to accomplish? And once you have that firmly engraved into yourself, share it with others. And that's where communication comes in and you start working around the letters. But the letters only make sense if they're focused on the mission. H. Ladies and gentlemen, focus on the mission and or the mantra of your organization. Once you do that, then work your way backwards to care and carry question for you Patrick, I read a book by a guy named Tom McCarthy who actually be coming on our show UH to do an episode. Who is phenomenal UH. Tom used to be the head of research and developed for Tony Robbins. He has been a successful entrepreneur, great guy and I met him through one of my network individuals. And Tom wrote a book called The Breakthrough Code, and Tom says in the Breakthrough Code, you need to create your...

...breakthrough result and then connect your breakthrough result to your purpose, connected to why you get up every morning, what you're doing. And as a leader, we have to do four things. Create vision, be innovative, relate to people, and make sense of things for people so they can do what do their job with ease or easier. How would you describe how important it is to connect your breakthrough result to the purpose of why you do what you do or why you get up every morning, especially passion when you're a leader. Well, as I pointed out with the like the accompaniment. For example, you know, if you're going to require that your people get up in the morning, come to work, be in a positive mode, deal with your customers and your mission in a positive way, you have to also so it starts with you. So that the breakthrough code being that if you want this organization to go to the very to the next step, then you have to be a leader worth following. And so we understand, you know, we have to communicate. You know, this is your job, this is your mission. We can lay all that, lay it all out for the people in front of us. We can listen to what they have to say, and unfortunately sometimes we can disregard it. We have a tendency to do that as well. We can give responsibility and then we can beat people over the head with it. We can do the evolve and the rest of it. But honestly, when you've got the missions as your core purpose, when you've got the mission ingrained into who you are and what you want to do, then that accompaniment becomes key because the first thing that they're gonna do is they're gonna look to your example. Do you truly believe what it is that you're giving them and the only way you're going to show you truly believe what it is you're telling them and requiring them as if you yourself are committed to doing it. M love it, love and love and love it. Passion. Last question as a leader, right, that is somebody who is trying to either continue to move the ship forward. They're coming in trying to reroute or realign and move the ship forward. You talk about mission, you talk about purpose. I think that's phenomenal. How important is it as a leader to trust your team members and delegate things to them in order to maximize your company and your company's vision to get to where you want to go? Because you and I both know as a leader you can't do everything. But if you're micromanaging, then I feel you are. You're stifling your people, which will lead to results not getting accomplished. If you're micromanaging, the message that you're sending is you don't trust them to do the job well enough. Therefore they require having you there. Um, the most important thing to recognize is that we're all the same. You know, going back to that religious perspective, we were made in the image and likeness of uh of an unchanging gud. We don't change. The reason the words in the Bible are relevant to us today that we're written five thousand plus years ago is because we as people don't change culture, technology, those things change. We don't. And so it comes from an understanding of who we are as people. First thing is we're emotional beings. You know, we have emotions within us that we express and those expressions find a place in our leadership as well. So that self understanding of who we are starts with understanding our emotions. And we all want to experience joy, um, but we have to recognize that there's other emotions at play. And I do a presentation on this that breaks down the emotions,...

...but generally it comes down to those four main emotions that we experience, and we experience joy, anger, sadness, and fear. And that's from psychologist today, many years ago. Um. And you have to recognize that not only do we as leaders experience of that, but the people that we're serving experience that. We have to deal with them as thinking, feeling people that are just like us. Unfortunately, as leaders, we tend to see ourselves as as a level above the people that are that are that we're serving. That the people that are in the organization we wouldn't put in charge of them because we're something special, We're something that's made different in them. That's not the case. So we have to first relate to people as human beings, and as human beings, we have our emotions and what people what what the psychologists have found is when you actually break down those emotions and you put like electrodes on people and try to measure their response to things, even anger and sadness or subsets of fear. When you see an animal cowering in the corner you baring their teeth at you, generally that animals afraid of you, not angry at you or scared of you. It's fear. So if our emotions can come down to joy and fear, what we find is that we don't do joy. We do love. And love is giving love. It comes springs from inside of you out to someone else. It's finding some way to give to someone else, doing for someone else what they need. And fear is selfish. Fear is inside of you. Fear is about what do I have to lose in this encounter? What? What? What is? What? What is this going to cost? Me? So, as a leader when you're looking at it through love and fear. Fear is that leader that is afraid to grow his people because you're going to lose his people eventually. Fear is that person who won't let go of the reins and has to micromanage everything because it doesn't trust the people to do the job well enough to his own satisfaction. That's the fear speaking. But if we can love and we can give from win ourselves and say, okay, what can I give you in this environment? First thing I can give you as the tools you need to do your job, the training you need to do your job. But the other thing I can give you is the responsibility to actually accomplish it. I can let go and I can give that to you. And then in giving, we find that people feel that trust that you have for them. And when they feel that trust, one you're going to find that innovation that comes from doing the job their way, but two, they're also gonna learn to lead. Eaders themselves were understands what a stick looks like. We know what it's like to be hit with a stick, so we can we lead with a stick because everyone understands it. Do this or else, do this? My way or else accomplish this from fire you, I'm gonna dock your pay. We understand what a stick looks like. But if you're truly going to take the carrot approach, and you have to understand that not everyone likes carrots, you know, it's it's about understanding that everyone's carrot looks different. What is it that this person wants out of this job? That's going to lead to the next thing. Why are they here? What are they trying to accomplish? Get to know your people and then you can actually truly take the characteristic approach and provide for that person what it is that they're truly after. That's that love that springs within you. I want you to accomplish your goals. I want you to have what you dream to have, and I'm going to help you get there as a leader. That's the essence of leadership is raising people up to be the best version of themselves. At Amazing interview. How can people get in touch with you? They want to hire you for a speaking job, they can go to my website. The most important thing is to recognize how my name is spelled. Yankee only has one e and if it helps you to remember it. Just remember that you have to buy vowels and we're cheap. So it's www dot Yankee Academy dot com y A n k E Academy dot com and you'll find everything you need there about me and how to contact me. Fantastic audience. The authentic tip for this amazing interview. Understand that you are unique. But the same time, understand...

...that you have to keep pushing, you have to keep going, you have to keep growing. And great leaders allow for two things advancement, responsibility, growth, and also they allow for growth into taking on more things and they can be given what more tasks and delegated to more. So advancement, growth and responsibility growth things that leaders should be instilling into their people. Great leadership again, it's not a title. It's not abuse of power, it's not a privilege. True leadership is a responsibility to serve others to help them accomplish their mission, therefore accomplishing the mission of the organization. Again. It was episode number fifty one of the Get Often with Market show. I'm your host Marcus Often t.

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