Get Authentic with Marques Ogden
Get Authentic with Marques Ogden

Episode 28 · 2 weeks ago

Get Authentic with Marques Ogden - Jon Heath

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Marques talks with Jon Heath

YEA, hello everybody, and welcome back to get authentic with Marcus show. I'm your host, Marcus Ogden, episode number twelve, and boy do we have a very special guest. I know this guy pretty well. He's my father in law, John Heat. John is with Kelly Williams in the Raleigh area, so excited to talk with him in a moment. Before we do that, we want to talk about our fantastic sponsors and mission a few of them to thank them for what they do for our show. Head Start Eckery, oh by my good friend Brian Hey and a multi family will stay, an investment brand out of San Antonio, Texas Canada. A Hint brand out of shot North Carolina, Lux Denver O, my good friend and client Robert Blaze, a realty brand out of Denver Colorado. Power plus mouthguard, a mouthguard brand. Oh by Dr Michael Hutchinson out of the Michigan area, and Stout Franchise adviasors my good friend of client Doug Stout. Helpful they want to get to the franchise business gets set up properly. Now let's welcome to the stage my great friend and my father in law, Mr John Heath. John Welcome to the show. Hey, I'm glad to be here. Glad to be here. All right, I want to get an authentic let's do it. Well, let's go ahead. Let's let's start right off the back. Always ask every question to the same person every time. Job. What does authentic, slash authenticity mean to you? Well, probably repeating others, but it's real, the real deal. I mean, you know, there's so many things that we have in our culture today that, uh, maybe you're more given to sound bites, but that's not who the person is or who the product is. So to me, authentic it really means just be real, keep it simple. I like it. Well, you know, I like I like how you said real deal. That's the first time we actually have heard that, because in life you need to be the real deal and not trying to be someone that you're not. So I really appreciate that. John, can you get a little bit of backstory on you? Where you're from, your only professional career and then, of course, what led you to working today, becoming a very successful real estate owner in the Raleigh area? Well, before I say that, I think I need to get with you after the show. I heard these other realtors or sponsors. I think I need to get on board with that. But uh, anyway, anyway. I mean, you know, it's your my son in law. I got of course, but no, my my background basically, for about thirty five years, Um, vocationally I was in ministry. I felt called the ministry at a young age. U pastored a couple of churches along the way that, you know, just worked in different areas of ministry. Came on staff as a staff minister here in, uh, the Raleigh, Durham Chapel Hill area, in two thousand we moved here and joined the staff here and uh, in two two thousand fourteen, I realized, personally realized that, you know, it's time for me to step away from Vocational Ministry. I had friends from around the country called me and say, Hey, is everything okay? I was like yeah, no problem, it's just I knew it...

...was time to step away and and uh do something a little different. Um, I didn't have my mind set on real estate at all, but a realtor who helped us sell in two thousand and twelve and by in two thousand twelve, after the transaction, she told me, she said, you know, you'd be really good in real estate. I thought, okay, thanks, but I'm not going to do anything with that. But when I stepped away from Vocational Ministry I realized, okay, I need to do something and my wife said, hey, why don't you just go ahead and check out that real estate thing that Jennifer was talking about? Okay, I guess. So I got my license and, you know, I got into the business and I do enjoy the marketplace tremendously. I like being involved in the marketplace. But then within a few months I realized, well, it's a lot like ministry. We have some difficult conversations, I'm managing emotions, I'm helping people get through crisis on some level. But so it kind of fit and I really enjoyed the process of negotiation, of structure Um. And one of the things that I've done uh in the real estate business is about three years ago I kept getting some ads on facebook about a gold mine right beneath your feet for realtors and I didn't really pay any attention to it, but at one point I just decided I'm going to check this out. Well, what it was was real estate for people who are going through divorce. The problem was that the model said go down to your local clerk of courts, right down who's filed for divorce, get their address, go over to their house and knock on the door and say hey, I'm here, I can help you. Well, the problem is is that that's for me. That's ambulance chase. It was horrible. Uh, you know, it was like no, maybe the person that answered the door doesn't even know that their spouses filed for divorce. And Wow, you just really squeeze the toothpaste out of the tube. But for me, for a number of years, thirteen years to be exact, I've been facilitating a program twice a year for thirteen weeks called divorce care. Now, when people come to those classes that I facilitate, they don't know that I'm in real estate, but I do know that there's some things about real estate that they should know. So I really began to research and study and I found a group in California that I've really been very much involved with for the past three years. That has put me in family law. Are The business of family law, working with attorneys, with their clients and really helping out, being a resource to attorneys and being a trusted third party neutral or for the people that unfortunately filing for divorce and going through that. And it's you know, the house in and of itself can be the greatest asset, but it can also be the greatest liability. And my first goal is to see if somebody can want to stay in the house, they want to keep it. Uh, let's get you, you know, checked out, get a lender and see if we can get you uh, if that's possible. But if not, I'll just help them with the transaction and just help processes. So for me it's the best of both worlds and in a sense I'm very familiar with with the nature of divorce, what goes on with people during that period of time. And at the same time it is still real estate. So I I do what I call happy real estate and and not so happy real estate adversity. But still I like I like the fact that I can be involved in helping people in that transaction. So let's get real John, when you're talking about happy real estate or not so happy real estate, I feel the most important aspect in either fronts it's gonna...

...be building trust with people, because buying a home, selling a home, going through a divorce, to sell a home, all these things are huge emotional processes that people will right. So how do you try to build trust with potential people on the happy real estate side, the not so happy real estate side, because I tell us all the time there's three things you have to to build trust. Show competency, deliver reliability have your clients best interests. When you do those three things, great things happen. So how do you John Develop and or build trust with people so they can know that you're the right real estation for them to want to work with? That's a great question. Well, again, going back to my previous background in pastoral ministry, the word fiduciary to me is synonymous with pastoral now I don't come on with some heavy message Uh Ministry when I'm doing real estate, but I do express the the place that I take is I work for the client. I'm working for their best interests. I sell the problem they have, not the solution. The solution can come, but I'm want to focus on what's the problem, what's the issue? What do you need? What are you looking for in a house? Let's let's solve that problem, because if I'm giving solutions before I really identify the problem that I think people might think he's just trying to sell me a house or he's trying to get me to buy something. Now, I'm not buying, nor am I selling. I am representing my clients in ways that are in their best interests. Case in point, if I walk into a house and I see something that it really needs to be pointed out, I'll tell them if I'm watching a client, whether it's from a buyer or even a seller, and I can pick up some things that are important to them and I ask them what is important to you and why is that important to you, so that I can make sure that I'm zeroing in on really the need that they're after. Now really, with all that said, I don't want to, you know, try to move a transaction to a benefit or to a place of benefiting me. I wanted to benefit them. I've had transactions before that. You know, it took three or four or five months before we were able to close just because of the market conditions. But the situation being is that I try to make certain that I understand what their problem is, or what they perceived their problem to be, and from there I go to a solution. So Trust is earned over a period of time. I know that it takes it takes a little a little while, but I think after two or three weeks whatever, just communicating and staying in touch, making sure that we're on point, uh, it can be getting fairly quickly. You know, I tell people all the time, John, that if you're gonna try to achieve a breakthrough in your life, you have to create your breakthrough result and you have to attach your breakthrough result to your purpose all the time. If you're going through life without a purpose, you're just going through life aimlessly, with no sort of trajectory growth anything in that fashion. So let's talk about your real estate journey. So you were in ministry for that many year, thirty five plus years. You got into real estate. So let's be real with our audience talk about some of the great things you went through in that process with them, some of the struggles you had going through that process, because people right now like like...

...realtors like I have a speaking job coming up in August for the Florida National Relatives Association for the entire State, where I'm one of the we're one of the speakers and our main keynote is Martha Stewart. So I'm excited about that opportunity. But many people John are trying to become realtors. Like Florida now is the largest state that has realtors. It's now larger than Texas and California. What is it about your journey you can share? Good at that, again, being authentic to help people who are listening that might want to either get into a new business or maybe get into her being a realtor can expect? Well, I think that that's a great question. I think that, you know, you need to have your Eyes Wide Open. I mean, there's a lot of compliance issues that you'll be responsible to keep uh, there's a lot of moving parts. It's it's primarily, you know, project managing for the most part, but in order to really be effective and what I would say, you know, successful, depending on what success means for you. Some people want to be the top agent in their market and some want to, you know, maybe be somewhere in between, and that's okay. But understand why you want to do it and know why you want to do it, because if you don't have a why behind why you're doing it, you really probably won't last. I'll just say it plainly, it's it is a lot of work. It's hard work. I think realtors the perception is as they get paid a lot for doing nothing, but that's not true. It really isn't true. I mean there's a lot that goes into establishing your brand, let alone with the brand. I mean the brand is great, but if you're not delivering, and when I say that meaning, it's just you've got to know the market, you've got to know, uh, the finances, you've got to know what's what the market's doing when it's coming to a shift. We're certainly in a shift now and which has probably been taking place over the last sixty to ninety days, and I say that nationally. Now our market still is very good here, very good in the Roley, Durham Chapel Hill area, but it still has shifted, and I'll give you a case in point. You know, one of the reasons it's are a couple of reasons that shifted is because of inventory, lack of it. The other is mortgage rates. Well, if I could just real quickly give you a point on mortgage rates going back forty plus years, I mean we've had mortgage rates in the two two that reached six. Guess what, people were buying houses in ninety one and eighty two. That seems rather high rate, but you know that's what they were doing. People still were buying. And then from from there you go too thousand and three, and rates started coming down. I mean they came down over a period of time, but they got below ten. And then in two thousand three, until this past year we've been anywhere between five and two and a half, which is great. I'm saying all that to say that education is also a big part. You've got to educate yourself and you've got to educate clients with with interest rates in particular. You know, there's an education factor. Yes, the rates have gone up in the past couple of months, but it's still a good time to buy a house because the mortgage rate can be refinanced at any time the you know. So get in the market so that you're you're earning equity, you have something of ownership, but you've got to you don't want to try to convince somebody of that because it's my idea. I want them to see the information so that they can get the idea, meaning become something they own...

...and therefore, uh, you know, you're halfway there to the success, but I would say for anybody that wanted to get in the business, be prepared, because it's it's it is a lot of work and but the rewards are great too, because you're helping people in different times, whether it's first time homebuyers, whether it's transitions, uh, you know, upgrading, downsizing, whatever the case may be. You're you're in a position to help people and to me, a good fiduciary, a good fiduciary, and that's important, is that you always remember what is in my client's best interests, and if you do that, you'll be fine. Ah, you know, John said a lot of great things, but one thing you said, one word I want to talk about to our audience. Brand. Brand is an extensive of you. It is what people look at, you value, you see you, that you bring to the table and so many people focus on trying to do business but don't brand themselves. Now, if you work for a corporation and you have a salary job and you're working in the cubicle, yeah, you don't have to brand yourself. But even if you are, I'm a realtor. I don't have to brand myself. I work for Kelly Williams. No, no, no, no, Keller says the overall mothership. You have to brand yourself individually, say if you're going insurance or financial advising, or if you're an entrepreneur, you know you have to develop a brand. You have to develop what is it that people when they see you or see your logo, they know exactly who you are and what to expect. How has it been for you developing your brand as a Kelly Williams, you know, individual that has its own brand set some land up, prouse, because when people don't understand that, that's a major factor if you're trying to become a realtor or any type of business where you have to be out there getting the sales for yourself. Yeah, well, that's great, you know. Simply, I would say that you use the word values. You definitely need to establish what are your values? What are your values, both publicly and personally, and when I say that, meaning to be authentic, you're you're gonna be the same person. You don't want to be one person when you're working and somebody else when you're not. I think because typically you your clients are everywhere. I mean your clients are around all the time, but I think that you know a simple mission statement, a simple value statement, and then recognize that the brand. In my particular case, my brand is about service. That, you know, absence of value. You know, people will argue commission all day. Well, I don't really want to argue commission. I just want to have my brand represent that, that I am of great value to the client and with that value, not only will I save them money, but I'll also be able to get them to a to the place they want to be. Uh. And so, you know, brand it really has to be. It's I mean it's great to be on social media, but it has to be consistent with what you deliver and what you not only intend to deliver but what you're all about. Because look, there there are a lot of realtors, a lot, I mean everybody knows a dozen, you know, family members, neighbors, whatever, and that's great. I'm not entitled to anybody's business other than what I what I have earned. So well, let me just say accept my children now. I...

...just want to make sure that they don't use anybody else. But I mean, you know, I don't I don't have this mindset that I'm entitled to that my neighbor's house across the street or next door, I'm entitled to to work with somebody because I've known them for years. Well, you know, it would be nice if people remember me, but it comes back to the brand and why people would use me. I gotta believe it's brand related. M H, I love how you said don't expect people to use because they've known you for a while. Then of course your family, your children, but not to have a sense of entitlements or an ego that you are gonna always get somebody because you've known them forever. And I don't think what happens is this is what the again, let's get real. People need to put and check their eat out to the side. Put it at the door, check it out and try and put it to the side. Check it at the door, and don't think just because somebody has known you for a while they should hire you right. So get ready to come to you know, John, on this interview. We've got a couple more questions here. How do you, as a individual who knows a lot of people, people respecting you from your work in the community of church, how do you maintain that really great part of your soul to come to the table, come to somebody's house, door, whatever, and say I'm a good person to work with, but not expecting to work because they knew you from prior experience. I want of people understand, because our listen sometimes might think, well, I work here for a long time, I knew when I worked there, we were co workers, friends, so whatever, and now you still know me, but we're not in the same relationship which you think, because you knew that person from a while go, you used to be able to work with them, and I want you to understand. You don't need to this again. You need to check your ego at the door and always make sure the good part of your soul is bigger than you're eager because if you're, if you're ego speaking of the good part of your soul, you're in a live trouble. Yeah, I mean, and you know there's a lot of realtors who are ego driven there and look some of that if it motivates them to do the work to be successful, because they're they're the work that has to be put in to even establish yourself as a qualified realtor or any other business, salesperson whatever. But I do think that when it comes to people that I already know, if they give me the opportunity to share market facts, in other words being knowledgeable enough of the market so that they are hearing and sensing, he does know what he's talking about. Again, if if there's something that somebody asked me about the market that I don't know, I'll tell them I don't know, but I will also tell them. If you don't mind, I'll get back with you with that answer because, you know, I want you to know that I didn't just pass that off as it's not important. So I think that, more than anything, it just really comes back to still being consistent, uh, you know, making certain that people, when you tell them something, if you here's a stickler or something that I'm very, very uh, it's important to me if I tell us a client that I'm gonna be over at their house at two o'clock because I've got a meeting with a listing appointment, I want to be there at five tail two. I don't want to be there at five after two or ten after two. Now, I understand that sometimes it obviously can't be helped, but it really means that I'm gonna make that meeting and just as important to them as it is to me and show them the respect that I'm gonna BE UNDONE...

...and we're gonna get this done. John, phenomenal interview. Lots of great things. How to build trust, how to connect with people, how to check it eager at the door, how to, you know, getting rid of some what people might think are false implications? Oh, real state. You can show up and make money. No, depend on you're speaking. Shop and make ten all the job. Absolutely not. Everything is a process. Every expert was once a beginner. So this interview, I feel, will help a lot of you. Help me include it about the importance of branding, bringing value. Be early, not just on time. One of my coaches always said if you're on time, you're late what you want to be. So a lot of great information, lots of great nuggets. John. It's mighty. was interested in connect with you, reaching out to you. How could they go about doing that? Yeah, you can. You can check with my web page, I will say, and the web page is flashed across there. I'm doing some updates on my web page, but you know it's in process. But you know you can connect with me there reaso realty dot com, or you can reach out to me by email. John At as J O N at Reaso Realty Dot Com. Awesome, awesome, Ladies and gentlemen, the authentic tip for the day. Don't expect anything that you want of any type of real large objective status or success amount of work to happen overnight. It's not gonna happen. John's been doing this. Real estate was his two thousand thirteen eight eight years. I started speaking in two thousand thirteen nine years. The whole process is about putting the work in. Again, every expert was once a beginner. But if you think you can go into something like real estate speaking and have a business and saying here I am making successful, don't bother. You're wasting your time because at the end of the day, if you're not gonna put the effort and the work in, you won't get the results out. Plain and simple again, everybody. Thank you, John. He's for joining us for nomenal interview. This is Marcus Ogden. If the getting to the Marcut show. Have a great day.

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