Get Authentic with Marques Ogden
Get Authentic with Marques Ogden

Episode 4 · 4 weeks ago

Get Authentic With Marques Ogden - Jeff Garcia

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Marques talks with Jeff Garcia

Yeah h hello everyone and welcome to the get authentic with Marcus show. This is our first ever airing special episode. We have an amazing guest. He's full of energy, full of life. Great Guy, former NFL athlete. He is a father, he is a provider, he was a phenomenal teammate. He's a philanthropist. Mr Jeff Garcia will be joining us in a moment. Before we get to Jeff, when I think a few of our azing sponsors, head, start equity owned by Brian Head, a multi family realty investment brand in San Antonio, Texas, Canada, Abe, a hint brand out of short North Carolina, Lux Denver, a realtor brand out of Denver Colorado. Power Plus, mouthguard by Dr Michael Hutchinson out of the Michigan area. Stout Franchise Advisors. Doug Stout and his brand helps people want to get into the franchise business. Now for our very first ever special episode, I welcome to the stage my good friend, NFL alumni, just great guy all around, Mr Jeff Garcia. Jeff, thanks for joining us, sir. How are you? Hey? I'm good, Marcus. How are you doing? Brother? Hey, it's great, great to be on here. Thank you for having me, and let's have a little fun with this. Let's do it, man. So, Jeff, before we get into the interview, what does the word authentic, slash often t his city, mean to Jeff Garcia? Yeah, to me that means you're real self. Hey, what it boils down to who you are from within. It's not what you necessarily present on the outside, but really who you are from within. Hey, what makes you tick, what makes you uh be the person that you are, how you represent yourself in so many ways. Uh, your roots, where you came from, and Uh are you still connected and committed to that, or how things change? But really it comes down to just the reality of who you are, man, and uh not anything superficial, not presenting uh something that you're not being somebody that who you aren't just being you, being real, and that's what it sounds like and what it means to me. Jeff. I Love, Love, love how you said staying connected to your roots. Right. It's interesting. My cousin sent me a picture last night of my father, father, me and my brother, and it was just awesome. I picture I had never seen before, Jeff, never, and I was like wow, look at that look at Jonathan, look at me, look at my dad, and to me that's authentic right, like knowing who you are, where you came from, never forgetting the start you had to get where you want. So excellently said. Now, Jeff, tell arms a little bit about who is Jeff Garcia. Where is he from? Upbringing? How did he grow up when he started playing sports? Kind of get into who is the man, the myth, the legend? I throw that in there, by the way, behind Jeff Garcia. I appreciate that. Yeah, man, Hey, I grew up in a small town. I'm a somewhat of a country boy. Grew up in northern California, about an hour south of San Francisco, uh, in a small town agriculture community uh, called Gilroy, and when I was growing up it was a town of about six teen thousand. It's expanded to a ground seventy thousand...

...because it's a somewhat of a suburb of San Jose and Silicon Valley. So when prices started getting high in that Silicon Valley area, people started moving down to Gilroy because it was only thirty miles away. But that being said, my parents still live in the same house. They've been there fifty two years. They've been married fifty six years and my dad was a football coach. But the Garcia side of me, the Magonald side, which you look at me and you're like he's a Mexican, that that boy was not Latin. Well, there's Irish Mexican right, and mom's side is the Irish, little bit of Scottish, and her dad played professional football way back in the day. Played at Kansas State University, played in the East West Shrine game as a pull back and then went on to initially the Washington Redskins, didn't end up making the team and then play in a separate league because there were more than one league at the time. It was a Pacific Coast League. He played with the L A bulldogs and they would travel to play the Chicago bears and teams like that. But that being said, he played there for a few years and then World War Two happened and a lot of guys decided hey to join the military and to commit to their country, and that's what my grandfather did. While he later moved around, became a high school football coach. He brought his four kids and wife to Gilroy, California, when my mom was a young child, Elementary School Age Kid, while my dad the Mexican side. My grandparents immigrated from Mexico, from Jalisco, Guadalajara area. They came up into northern California, into that Central Coast Valley, to basically work the fields, to get out there and start picking lettuce, Tomato, Cucumber, a cherries, whatever, strawberries, whatever was in season. That was what my grandmother did. She had nine kids, my dad being the third youngest of the crew, and he grew up knowing what hard work was all about, having to work the fields, having to contribute to the family at an early age. Well, he also had a love of sports and a passion for it and that's probably what kept him in school. Fast forward, my dad ended up meeting my mom at the local junior college. After my dad served four years in the army, he came back to go into the junior college and play football, basketball baseball, while my mom was just coming out of high school and entering the junior college herself. And so they met there and then later in life my dad became the head football coach there at gavelen junior college in my hometown. So that's when I came into life and UH started growing up around my dad and my mom would drop me off at his practices and really those eighteen, nine twenty year old young men, those guys were like my idols. I wanted to be like those guys. I wanted to play for my dad. I saw how my dad just inspired, motivating, loved on these kids. A lot of these kids came from outside of the state, Stupenville, Ohio, New Jersey, Florida, all over the country, and a lot of them came from single parent households and my dad became somewhat of a father figure. And it's funny. I could go back and visit my dad today, he's almost eighty one years old, and he'll get a call from one of his players back in nineteen seventy two, nineteen seventy three, we're talking fifty plus years ago, fifty years ago, and these guys are calling up going hey, coach, how you doing? Mana, I love you, man. And that's the type of impact that my dad had on people, and so I grew up around that. I grew up being able to experience that. I had a love for sports. I was playing soccer, I was playing basketball, I was playing little league baseball, starting with t ball, all those things, and I started to really become interested in football obviously being around it. So as soon as...

I could play, at that pop owner age of nine years old, I was like mom, sign me up, I want to play football, and that's where it all started for me. I continued playing all three sports, but also growing up on a small farm. We had four acres. We had cows, we had horses, we had dogs, we had all kinds of animals on this acreage and I had to learn work from an early age. I was changing pikes, irrigating fields, moving cows, feeding cows, we were bailing hey, we were picking our own cherry tomatoes and trying to make an extra dollar to make ends neat, so to speak, and so my childhood wasn't always about fun and Games. Before I could go to town and play with my buddies and be on the field or be on the basketball court or in the playground, I had chores man, I had work to do. I had to mow laws, I had to irrigate fields, I had to drive some tractor. To This Day, my dad, like I said, almost eighty one years old, still gets on a tractor, still does his jobs for people. He retired from coaching, UH, twenty plus years ago or close to thirty years ago, but kept on the farmer's side and he today. His Passion, his mentality is, if I don't keep going, then somebody's gonna take me away from this world, and he just has that drive and that mentality to get out there and it's peace to him. But that was a lot of my childhood. There were also some very difficult times in my childhood. Before I was born, my mom carried twin girls to seven months. Her water broke in nineteen sixty eight, with technology not being as strong and not being where it is today, those twin girls lived ten to twelve hours and didn't make it. Didn't survive. I was then born in February of nineteen seventy and then I had a brother born in March of nineteen seventy one, a year and eleven days younger than me, and then a sister born three years after I was born, in nineteen seventy three. She was three years younger than me. Within six years, seven years actually, Um, my brother passed in a drowning accident. We were camping and fishing up at mammoth lakes in central, east central California. A bunch of families were up there and the boys walked off to fish the lake. The river was moving pretty fast and my brother fell in and six years old. We couldn't retrieve them. We couldn't save them. A year later, and that was Memorial Day weekend. A year later, on my dad's birthday, July four my sister was riding with my dad and fell out of the back of a pickup truck and passed away due to blows to her head. She was, like I said, she was five years old, three years younger than me, and I do have two sisters now that are eight, nine years younger than me. But our family has been through an awful lot. I don't know how my parents managed to stay together through it all. I mean it was definitely a difficult situation. Uh, anytime you experience, as you know, as I know, having children today, the worst thing, the last thing that you ever want to go through is the loss of a child. And for my parents to experience what they've gone through and still be together today, still be living, still be thriving, they are the strongest people, uh, that I know. My Mom. What she has endured as a mother I would wish upon nobody else, and you don't see things like this unless you're in a country that's going through war and you see that sort of travesty and for my mom to lose for of her children really, Um was a sad, sad situation in our lives growing up. But Really Sports, sports meant sports, was really my outlet. Sports was really what allowed out need to maybe not focus on what we lost but really...

...look toward what can be gained in being around other people, being in that social environment, having some discipline, having some expectation. For me, the last thing that I wanted to do as a child, as a seven and eight year old boy who just lost his best friend, his brother, his, you know, little sister. The last thing I want to do was disappoint my parents anything anymore. And and there wasn't therapy at that time. There wasn't hey, jeff needs to go see a therapist now once a week, because how does a child deal with that sort of loss? There wasn't that sort of option back in the day and we didn't have the money to probably seek that out either. So it really became sports as my therapeutic mission to really better myself, to be committed to something, to have, uh an obligation to teammates, to Uh to a team, to myself, to to get out of the positivity and and all those things, and that became my life. That became and I think in a lot of ways it helped my mom too. It helped her get out of bed each day to take care of myself, take care of my two younger sisters, to to to be president, so to speak, because I could easily see how she could choose to go the other way. My Dad dove into his work. He was a coach, he was a teacher, he was starting an athletic club in our hometown. He dove into all of the things that he could keep busy with really to keep his mind off of some of the things that have happened. and Uh so that was part of my childhood, man, and you know, it was. There were so many things that were, I guess, I feel like, at times where we were cursed in a sense. But Um, as as sad as that is, there were some blessings that came out of it. I learned to a pre shape life at a young age, where I really valued the daily life because I saw where life could be taking from you at any time and we don't control that. It's out of it's out of our control. I mean my brother, I'm sure didn't expect to be walking along the Ledge and, whatever happened, trip and fall into a fast moving river. He didn't jump in there. It was completely accidental, and the same thing with my sister. They were just unfortunate accidents. But that just goes to prove you just don't know when your time is up and for me to learn that at a young age it made me really value relationships, value my parents, wanting to help, to put a smile on their face, whether it was getting good grades in school, being a good kid, being appreciative, being respectful, participating in Sports, staying busy, all those things were just really what I learned early on in life and UH and wanted to be the best I could at it. I wasn't always the best athlete out there. I wasn't always the strongest or fastest or quickest whatever. I really developed late, but I had a mentality that I was gonna I just was competitive. I was not going to be denied and that was like the differentiator for me as a young kid, until my skill level started to really catch up and the development of my body started to catch up. That's when I was able to take it to another level. You know, Jeff, let's get real, all the things that you have endured in your young childhood to adulthood, to all things you've done, it's no wonder you're such a winner, because winning comes from our ability to be able to endure struggles, adversity, hard times and keep pushing forward. So I think it's really, really important people that are listening to understand that Jeff is not just a winner because he's done successful things on the football field. Jeff...

...has had to endure a lot to get to the football field and then he used that energy, that drive, that passion to be the best. So again, Jeff, you know you have a phenomenal football career and all that stuff. Talk to us about what are you doing today? What are you, at this point in your life, going on for today? I've been very fortunate too, with the career that I had in the NFL to really set my family up in a good, uh financial situation. I don't have to necessarily go out there and chase the check. I could really look at things that touch my heart, that I'm passionate about, that I want to contribute to. That being said, though, there is a transition phase that we all go through, that all of us athletes go through, and there's a struggle that takes place, and I think today's athlete is doing a better job of setting up life after the game and just with all of the accessibility is, especially through social media and all the social platforms, they're creating more monetary opportunities for themselves that could be long lasting business relationships, all those things. When I was playing the game, I was right there in Silicon Valley, a forty nine or quarterback. I should have been establishing relationships with companies like Google, like Microsoft, like all these big companies, but I was so focused on holding onto my job being the best that I could be as a football player. Ain't working toward that. All offseason. I wasn't out on the golf course, I was out in the gym. I was trying to stay strong, stay mobile, stay active, stay competitive, all those things. And so you know, coming into this phase, as you and I discussed prior to this, there is a huge letdown because we're no longer on that stage where we were a little kid in a candy store, so to speak, where we had just the life, the bull by the horns. We had life at our fingertips in the sense of doing something that we were passionate about, that we loved. Hey, there was whether they hated you or loved you, there was seventy five people screaming at you in a center stage environment and that was awesome. That was awesome. We got to fulfill a dream come true, a childhood dream come true, and to transition from that to where there is really an emptiness and if we don't have that next phase of our life planned or maybe taking steps in the direction of that, a lot of guys end up being lost. Now I was just starting to have a family as I was coming out of my nfl career and I was really excited about being a dad and right away we started having kids, a four back to back. I have a daughter, Pressley, who just turned fourteen. She'll be in high school this year, some third team going to the eighth grade, a son that will be twelve going into the sixth grade and that will be eleven going into fit. So we're back to back, four within four years. They're busy, they're active, they're involved in sports. I'm blessed that I get to coach them, that I get to be a part of their lives. I Dabbled in coaching. I loved the game of football and I could be a tremendous asset to a high school, to a college, to a professional football team, and I went that direction for a couple of years because I was finding that I felt lost, that I felt like I didn't have the direction that I needed, that I needed to show my kids that, hey, I still have work ethic, I still have drive, I still have commitment. We just don't live in a country club lifestyle in a great place. Hey, we didn't get here because we sat on our tails and life and and and and success just happened. I had to work for it and I don't want my kids to see that. NOWADAD's just there to pick us up from school, will drop us off...

...from school. He's there whenever we need them, whenever we want them. And so I was like I need to do something and I started training quarterbacks locally here in San Diego and I loved it. The next thing you know, I got a call from Montreal alouettes of the CFL, Canadian football league, and they wanted me to come in as an advisor to the offense, be a fly on the wall. Well, next thing you know, the coaches asking me to be the quarterback coach and I couldn't say no. So I ended up coaching that team for four months, having a great experience, but I was away from my family. They were here in San Diego, I was in Montreal and the limit of seeing them, the limit of being a part of their life, just really affected me. But that being said, I was like, I love coaching, I love being around the players. Hey, now you get that Game Day environment and atmosphere which we thrived upon as players. So I got hired by the St Louis Rams there last year in St St Louis, by Jeff Fisher and I was an assistant receiver coach and I went through that entire season. It was a grind. Did I enjoy it? Absolutely. I enjoyed it because of the connect you with the actual players and how they look at you and how they respect you and appreciate you because you've walked in their shoes, you've worn their shoes, you've created your own success and have gotten to the highest level of the game and they had that respect for you and I loved having that with my players out there. The problem was that here I am probably the most experienced quarterback in the building, but yet I can never talk to the quarterbacks, I can never help the quarterbacks, and the biggest struggle of that team that year with two new quarterbacks, was that we were struggling at the quarterback position. But yet I had to be hands off. And the politics of the whole game we're something that just kind of bothered me, you know, in the sense of, Gosh, I'm here at your disposal. All I want to do is when I don't care who takes the credit, but let me help where I'm most valuable, where I could be most valuable, and that was being completely looked over. The other problem with coaching was that again I was away from my kids. They stayed in San Diego, I was there in St Louis and I thought, man, if I continue down this path, I'm never gonna be a part of my kids lives. I'M NOT gonna see their games, I'm gonna miss all their school uh obligations or or or shows at school, all those things that are part of their lives that my parents were a part of my life with I'm gonna miss out on and you know what, I don't want to be that. I don't want to miss out on my kids lives, especially during these young developmental periods. And so I got out of the coaching game. I came back home and really just dedicated myself as a father to my children, being available, being there for them. I also dabble in some things outside of the game of football and outside of what I do for my children. Uh, from an equity standpoint, I worked with a group called the red door capital. So we look at startup companies, whether there's something that we truly believe in. We raise money for those type of opportunities. And then I get to coach Pop Warner football man. I get to coach my boys. They have a passion to play football, they want to be out there and and that's what's important to me. I'm not pushing them, I'm not forcing them to do it, but they want to do it, so I get to be a part of it. And Uh, we had a great run last year with my young TENU team. We won the San Diego Pop Warner Championship and now we're going on to elevenue and I get to coach my little guy. He wants to play quarterback and I get to have fun with that, and my daughters as well, um all being extremely active and and athletic and just wanting to be a part of things, and so that's where my life has taken me to really being able to be selective. As I talked to you earlier. Hey, I do football camps here and there. I've done them here in San Diego. I go back to my hometown of Gilroy, we do a football camp at the end of July. That's where I really get to touch the kids. And then all the charity and and giving back. We were able to give...

...back some scholarships to some high school student athletes last year from my home town and contribute to a foster home community. And you know, I've always been very excited about philanthropic opportunities. Because of the platform, the stage that we have as professional athletes, we are in a in a position to really get people's attention and to give back to to those who are in need, and especially when it means our youth in tough environments and tough communities. What can we do to help them smile, help them have a positive experience, help them believe in a dream? And it doesn't necessarily have to be a professional athlete. It could be anything in their lives, and that's what we need to be able to mentor and educate that you truly had become something special, just like I was, and I didn't fit the stereotype. I was not the biggest, strongest fastest. I didn't grow up in what you would call the most difficult environments where I had to scratch and call my way out, but I grew up in an atmosphere where hey work was expected, dedication was expected, loyalty and accountability were expected and I just had this inner fire burning that made me want to prove people wrong and prove that I could, prove to myself that I could continue to climb that mountain, and it was one step at a time. Be The best I can be in high school, be the best that I can be in junior college. First, I didn't get recruited by major colleges coming out of high school, so be the best I could be at a J C, then at a major college and then the Canadian football league. I didn't go into the NFL, even though I was a record breaking quarterback at Sandoz State. I went played in the East West Shrine game on the M V P of the game, but nobody in the NFL was interested. So I go to the CFL and I earned my stripes there and then the door opens, and every time I saw a door start to crack open, my mentality was I was gonna blow that door open, and that's what differentiated me from some of these other guys who may have been more talented, who may have had better physical attributes, but I was just not gonna be denial. Ladies and gentlemen, this is exactly what the get authentic with Marcus show is all about. It's about amazing people with amazing stories. The authentic tip for you that's listening or I heard Jeff Garcia's Andy. This is what I got out of it. You don't have to be the best to do your best. It's all about taking the opportunity that you have, doing the most you have with it and going after it. Jeff did that in high school, in Junior College, to college to CFL to NFL. He's made some I love how we talked about transitioning. Things weren't easy. He was looking at to get into coaching. I didn't work out either. The same thing. It didn't work out. I wanted more. I want to be around my children, I want to be around for them, to be available for my family. So another thing I want to say, one more authentic tip. Have your priorities in line. That's huge. You only can have and be at one place at one time. So pick and choose your priorities and make those the way that you want to live your life. Jeff has an amazing story, just absolutely sensational, but that's what this show is all about. I don't care about Jeff at clays, the NFL. I watched him on TV in the nineties and to do grade would be that's awesome. But what I learned about Jeff's like his struggles growing up, the tragedy, the how his parents are now still together after all those things, that's the things that people need to hear, because now, Jeff...

...knows this. In two thousand two the pandemic, it's still here. We're in a recession. Times are heard. People need inspiration, they need hope. Jeff provided me today with inspiration and hope. I hope you did the same thing for you again. This was our first ever inaugural special episode of the get authentick with Marcus show. We were joined and we were just touched by Mr Jeff Garcia, amazing man. Thank you so much for coming on, Jeff. Everybody's listening. Thank you so much. Have a great day. M M m M. Work were Parklam Worka Parklan Ka, Parklam, W Parkam R parkam wring work were work.

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