Get Authentic with Marques Ogden
Get Authentic with Marques Ogden

Episode 6 · 3 weeks ago

Get Authentic with Marques Ogden - Ed Latimore

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Marques speaks with heavyweight boxer Ed Latimore.

Yeah, hello everyone and welcome back to the get authentick with Marcus show. I'm your host, Marcus Ogden. This is a special episode. We're gonna be interviewing former heavyweight boxer Ed lattimore. But before we get to Ed, I think a few of our amazing sponsors. Head Start Equity owned by Brian Head, a multi family real estate investment brand out of San Antonio, Texas. Canadate, a hip brand out of shot North Carolina, Lux Denver, a realtor brand out of Denver Colorado. Power Plus mouthguard by Dr Michael Hutchinson. It's a power plus mouthguard brand to help you reduce injuries while playing sports, and stout. Franchise Advisors. Oh but my good friend Doug Stout, it helps you turn your franchise into a business or turn your business into a franchise. Now welcome to the stage, Mr Ed Lattimore. How you doing to the add I'm doing fantastic, man. I hope you're doing just well, doing great man. Everything's going well over here in Rod North Carolina. So, before we get started, can you tell our audience one quick thing, one quick thing, what let's authentic slash authenticity mean to add uh you know, it means integrity, and I've always enjoyed the word integrity because when I looked up with that what that meant many years ago, it always stuck with me and it just means that your actions are in line with your thoughts, are in line with your emotions, and and all of that comes from our is driven by a kind of your willpower, that that thing that makes you act despite how you feel otherwise. And if you're able to do this, if you're able to align everything and act despite your feelings in the short term, then then not only do you transform your life, you you build something really authentic and and powerful. You. You're you're impossible to tempt and lead and take advantage of. You won't be Lazy, you know, you won't overindulge. It becomes very difficult for you to be knocked off the path of you know what, we'll just kind of sound cliche. kind of it's it's very difficult for you to get knocked off the path of righteousness when you lead an authentic life. In this regard, you know, and I love how you said, being control of your emotions and keep yourself stable. One of the things I've learned as of late is that when you're calm and you're very docile and you're very authentic and you don't waiver, people stop playing games with you because you're not being affected or affected by the Games they're trying to play. When people feel they can get your emotions running high, where you become emotional and you're not cognitive, that's when bad things happen. But if you're a cool, calm collective, you're not waivered, you don't change, you're consistent and I like to call it you've made adjustments right, you've made adjustments in your lifetime, not just changes, because change me, you might, you might stay that right with the full life, you might go back. You know, it's kind of like a back and forth, Yo, Yo. So you make adjustments right, and that's when great things happen, because you're not wavered or you're not, you know, concerned about what others...

...say and you're not going to get out of your cheat because you're all in your own space and your own positive energy. So tell all this a little bit about your story, like where you're from, your background. Let us know who is at Lattimore and talk to us about how you got from your upbringing to being a professional heavyweight boxer. Uh Yeah, that's a that's a fun, fun kind of journey to kind of walk through. So I'm born into a typical kind of at riskue statistic environment. Single Mom, lived in public housing, UH, on and off public assistance, and and I was never that kid that that let myself get sucked into the environment. You know, some of that is luck, like just because I was designed and you know what, you come out the wound with. Other other parts of it were you know, I think you know, I always say my mom made a lot of mistakes, but are a lot of things she did really well and I think she did a pretty good job of making sure that that life was unappealing a lot of the traps you could fall into around, you know. But that also simultaneously pushed me away because I kind of saw my mom as part of that life, or at least, uh tangentially related to it. So when I got to high school, I ended up spending a lot of time away from home. I went to high school and in a different neighborhood, away from everybody, and and there, you know, I did what most high school kids do, or our boys. I played football and I actually played every sport I could because not not because I thought I was was a good athlete or anything, but it gave me a reason to not go home, and so I kept doing that. And if I didn't have a sport, I was working, so I was always at the house. I didn't start fighting, believe it or not, I didn't start fighting until I graduated from high school and I was looking for something to do. You and and the Genesis, when I remember is there was this I was dating this girl and I had already tried to go to college once and it was it didn't work out, but I was dating this girl and I used to talk to her a lot, and really anyone who would listen about how worthless and pointless I thought college was. not part of that was sour grapes, but the other part of it was was a genuine assessment of what the institution was and what it was becoming. I mean, like now I have the same feelings. The difference I have a degree in physics, so no one could really like tell me it's because I'm bitter about graduating, but I used to talk to everybody about, like, all right, you know how stupid college is. This and that, and finally her mom was like who happened to be a college professor? Mind you, her mom was like, all right, so let's pretend you're right. Uh, in college is pointless. What have you done with with your life over the past four years? I was twinty two, and what if you're done with your life over the past three years other than show up at my house and eat my food? And then she threw me out and I had, you know, I crowd a little man here, because it was I was, you know, I got checked with some tough lot, but she was right and I hadn't done anything and I was looking and I said, okay, what am I gonna do with my life? At twenty two, I was looking at two options. I said, I can join the military or I can box, because because youtube had just come out around then. I think this was background two thousand and seven, and Youtube was just getting big and looking fights online and I said, yeah, I can do that, that looks cool and get hit. How bad could it be? These guys do it all the time. And so I found an amateur boxing gym and that's how I started. I started the right way. A lot of guys who start that old, because I mean twenty two is old to start Um. A lot of guys who start that old they want to immediately go and be a professional and make money. But it. But I'm not that. They are parts of me that...

...are impulsive, but there are other parts I am I look at the data and I try to make the best decision possible, and the best decision possible. There's no money in boxing, but there's even less money if you try and go about it without without the proper development through the amateurs were not only are you developing, like your skill, but your business contacts and the people you'll see, so that when you turn pro it's gonna be a lot easier for you to get a contract, for you to get signed, and you'll also be able to beat more gods because you spent because because no one remembers your amateur record, like like box wreck dot com, which is like the holy grow of all professional records in the world. Ever, they used to, are not used to. They just started putting up your amateur record if they can, like find it by looking at your book, because not a whole system for for booking fights as an amateur is it's literally Dune to like a book. It was done to you show up with your book from issue by US, a boxing that makes you paid your feet and you're good. Well, not everything's a computer. So they can like dig up stuff if they want to, and then it's not accurate. Like I looked at mind, some of those fights didn't happen, uh, but I was like, you know whatever, right, and some of them, and some of the bigger ones did and they didn't include them. But that's how I think that got started. From me, man, I wanted to to do something in my life. I wanted to be somebody more than what I was, which was just as God. I was working at starbucks and drinking. That's what I was doing and I wouldn't and I wasn't doing things because I was a timid. God, I wasn't timid. With timid is the wrong word. I think I had a lot of insecurities and those insecurities manifested an interesting way. I was dating as this beautiful girl, still beautiful girl by by anyone's standards, and I didn't want to like ever not see her any day. So I wouldn't do jobs or I you know, I was worried about leaving because I had. I was at this hatchment that I got. I got something from that, and and and then you're looking back, it sounds silly because now I'm like, you know, I gotta do what I gotta do. Is like I got a whole wife and I'm like Yo, if she's a problem, you know, go, go, are we have a thing to do, I go do it. But that's just, you know, some of the growth that comes with age. I goes h. So you had an amazing career with thirteen one and one and your professional fights. What what made you stop boxing? Like, what was it? What was it about that part of your journey? And again, we call this this being regal because, wow, he was thirteen one and one. Things were going great. has some big fights once and big fights. Then all of a sudden he just you know, you're not boxing anymore. So tell all listens a little bit about that story, like how did that come about? So so you know, there's a great story kind of how it has happened, because, okay, so, so I was fighting throughout two thousand and sixteen. I actually took the second half half of two thousand and sixteen off from school because I was in school at the same time. I took the second half of two sixteen. I lost my fight. I lost my first fight, only lost right UH in two thousand and sixteen. I fought one more time in December that year to a draw and I was just I was beat up and down trodden and boxing had had ruined I after the past three years, or two and a half. I was signed with rock nation sports at those two and a half years showed me the just the meat grinder, what it really is like. I like, I knew what it was like like, knew what it was but but being and I was like, Oh man, this is miserable. But I wasn't ready to give up, not even close. But I needed a break. So what I did? I took I took all the two thousand and seventeen off so I could focus one focus on school and knock out most of my degree. I was almost dumb,...

...and he'll like I was. I didn't realize how beat up I was until about five months in and I realized that I could stand straight up when I wobbling. I was like wow, I must have had like multiple concussions and all conds of things and and you know, I just enjoy my life right. And then an interesting thing happened in seventeen to continued instituen my my writing and my website, really in my social media presence. That really continued to grow because I self published my first book in Seventeen. Combined that with, you know, I'd always been talking about what I was doing in school and and being a fighter. You know, people are more now really interested in the story. I really drummed up authentic press on my own and almost by accident really, and so what that did was that opened up a lot of opportunities to make money. But I wasn't interested in leaving fighting behind. So, like I said, true to myself, I told my manager of my team, I said after that fight on December, I think it was sixteen, two sixteen, I said, I'm gonna take this year off. Just let me be right and take this year off and I'll be back in the gym January. One Short, short enough. I was nobody's in there, but I wanted to like set the tone for my mentality and I was training, really, really working, putting to work in him as my final semester school as well, and and I had been talking about everything. I was doing on social media because because by that point I really understood the power of it and I got a fight. I got offer the fight to go fight this guy in New Zealand. Would have been would have been a great fight. I would have beat him, I'm almost positive. And I got elbow zealous. The one thing I was never in fighting. I was never afraid. Some guys, every guy comes in with something and I would I would like to think that I had no issues of fear. Like for me, I very much was that I might either come out on my shield or come back with it kind of do right. And so that is good a lot of times. Sometimes that's a bad trade. And where it was a bad trade is there was this guy, we used a spawn partner up Untiledo, a little further north of me, and I said I'M gonna go up here and spat with this guy. said he'll come down and spat with us this when we need him. And I ain't telling my coach. I just said I go do it, knock, got a few rounds, bounce out. Well, what this guy? You know, one of the things you forget when you when you being like, you know, real head strong and you and you're not afraid. This guy had been training the whole time I was not training. I was a better fighter and much stronger because I got in the weight program and everything. Uh, but he was just sharper as he should have been. And and I remember I was stepping off off of the corner to get out of the corner of an attack. I took a punch to the eye and I knew exactly what happened because the same thing happened to me is an amateur. I broke the orbital bowl and and my left eyes. An amateur is a pro. Was My right and I needed surgery when I did it as an amateur. This time I didn't need surgery, but there was no way I can take that fight. So I told my coach this. This wasn't mad. I told my coach. He was mad. Chew me out and then he said look at Your Life Right now, look what you've done over the past year. Uh, you don't. You don't need this anymore and you're my friend. I don't want to see you get hurt if you don't have to, because boxing is weird that way. Right. We know there's a risk and we we accepted but we kind of forget about it, right, because you can't be thinking about it if you want to be effective. But my coach is like, look, man, you don't you don't need to do it anymore. I had just graduated Um and I had my first it was I had been making money on line all throughen but but that month was the first month I made more than ten thousand dollars online through the right and the line. I actually cleared a little over thirty...

...and my coach, what are you doing? You don't need to do this, like I'll train you if you want to do it, but but take some time and think about this right. And so I I thought about it and and thinking about it. I wrote a whole article about this because I get that question a lot, like why did you start with thirty one one? So I had to. I wrote an article about it asaw it from all the other ways to make money right, because that that's really a big deal, because a lot of guys keep fighting because there's there's really no other way they're gonna be able to make and you don't even make that much. You're fighting. It's just you make it in a certain way. You don't have to go to work right. Uh. The other thing too, is as I was looking, I took my coaches advice. I sat and thought about it and realistically I'm only six one. And then that's not like and that that's weird to say, is an athlete. You get it though, like only six one. It's kind of like that. That precludes you from some positions in football right as being six one you can't do anything right or excludes you. So. But but in in a heavyweight division where I fir, the average height is six four and I'm six one and we're fighting at two fifteen. That that was my fighting way. These guys are like toot five to fifty. So I said I can put in a lot of effort because I was I had learned some skill, but I wasn't like a naturally highly skilled guy. I trained my ass off and that's how I developed what I had. But there'll be guys to come who are natural, who are bigger. I don't know if you follow the sport at all, but a great example this is when Andy Ruise went in there and knocked out Anthony Joshua. A lot of people don't notice Joshua was a late starter too in the game Joshua to start boxing through was like ninety. Andy Ruiz is, you know, Mexican lineat boxing man, even fighting for a while and even though that guy was out of shape, he was faster to the draw and knew how to fight and beat the World Chap. But Rui's only six three. I say only six, because that's strong in the average, still taller than me. And I'm like, all right, I could do all this training and I am best, I might make it into the top ten and all that. And I think in terms of opportunity costs as well, just being honest, and I said look, all the energy is gonna take and all the time it's gonna take, an all the sacrifice is gonna take to get into the top ten. Is that worth it? What do I get to walk away with? What like because, being completely honest, I thought this then. Ish I know it now, because what I thought we were in a transition to this era of these super heavyweight you know, Klisko had been around, but most of the guys he fought were smaller. Now you mean you look at the top names in the sport? You Know Tyson fury six six, Anthony Johns was six or types of very six nine. Anthony Johnson was six six, down to water, six seven, Um, Louis Ortiz six four, Charles Marton six five, did Trevor Brown, who just lined six five. Like these, these are like big dudes at the A and B level. Derek to SOA, Um, I mean Dylan White, not dylan white over in the UK. Another guy that's like six four man, but but a big six four. I mean it was just I said, you know, I could put all this effort in and Really Bang my head and probably come out of this worse, because I'm lucky. I walked away with minimal injury. I still got balance issues, but it's minimal, certainly not as bad as it could be, and I just said, you know, I got a lot of talents and I can go do something else. Let me go do it now. If I didn't have the other talent, if I was maybe an inch and a half taller, uh, you know, maybe I stick around, to be to be completely honest, and I would have definitely kept like had I wanted to fight out lost. They just kept moving me to Um. But to tell all loss, I became world champ, I mean, but but at at six one fighting way of two fifteen. The odds of me become a world champ or are slim to none in the heavy way to vision, so scary. Wrap up this interview,...

Um, tell me, what are you doing now? So what is it that you're focused on now? I love how you said, let's get real, you realize you had more skills to offer than just boxing. You had something to bring to the table other than that. So I love to hear a little more about what you're doing now your career. I see your I read you're at chess enthusiast. You're a two time bestselling author. You do some speaking. What are you? What is Ed Lattimore up to these days? Yeah, man, speaking, some speaking, and you know, funny I got. I got a message this morning. It was crazy. I got a message this morning and somebody was like on Lincoln, Oh, identity and addiction. Man, brilliant and I love that speech and I'm like now, I know that I gave that speech, but I gave that speeches, a Ted talk, and I didn't know that it was up of that's because, because I don't know if you know, you but, like you know, you can't just go do a Ted talk and uploading no, it's gotta be like done on a licensed event and then Ted's gotta approve it and then they put on their website and but but somebody had seen it. They were like Oh cool, and that that's been like the highlight of my day. I've been sharing that, but everybody. But what I do right now, my my source of income. I am you know, I put a lot of energy into understanding communication, in particular, you know, writing, and how it makes people think feel, what it gets them to do, how to use it effectively on social media and the long form of websites or emails, and so I'm always using that to, you know, to sell things on my site passively, because I really think passive income is is a key to removing a level of stress that that is you know, you just don't need it. It's like background anxiety. You know, you know what the difference is. You know what the passive income is like that feeling you get when the when the rents do and you work hourly. I don't know if you've ever been there, but when you what, you work hourly and the rents do and you're like I gotta get enough hours and I hope the car don't break and, you know, and I want to eat food and let's hope I don't do something dumb and gotta pay for it. Kind of do that feeling you have when you're living that passive income is the opposite of that, like it's like, Oh, well, I know two dollars came in and all my bills are paid. Well, I was just gonna sit there and maybe I'll investor to do somebody and that's cool. So so I'm really I'm really focused on building my kind of my background passive income machine. But as far as my my contribution to the world teaching writing. I love teaching writing and all forms are consulting with people on their websites, helping them understand on page S C oh and how to write, you know, in a manner that makes it more clear, or in general, just how to communicate their message with people and the stars one. The other thing is is I'm really big into the addiction it's space. I work with Gods who are trying to get sober. I work with Gods who are trying to quit Internet pornography. Those are the two things I know. If I was a crack hand before, I'd work with crack, you know, with guys on drugs. But I wasn't there and and I'm not. So all addictions are the same, but all addictions are different, right, and so I know that, like, while generally I can offer something, specifically, I wouldn't want to take somebody's UH situation into my hands directly, but but God, struggling with alcohol, I I can very, very much talk to them. That's what the Ted talk was about, right. and Um, that's what my book is about, what my second book. That's what it's about dealing with. But sobriety, it's really an important thing to me because I think, you know, that's the best gift I've ever given myself. I can't imagine I'd have the life I have now if I kept drinking, because I know what drinking was doing to me. I know, I know where it was. So I like to get back there and and just, you know, always just just being writing. It's always because we live in this wonderful age where...

...if you put them you you can build something from the ground up. Like this website was built from the ground up. I built it before, you know, before I turned pro. I just always liked writing. I Bet I think I was right when I was an amateron and just writing and putting the articles up, learning, taking my experiences, breaking them down, putting them out there and and it really has come back to be just an awesome thing for me that I'm really grateful for. So those are that's what I'm doing now. Fantastic man. And how can people get in touch with you? What's your website? You know, how can they connect with you? They want to find out more about your right a, things like that. How can we get in touch with you? Well, the cool thing about me, and it's gonna be bad somebody else in the future, is that my name is simple at Lattimore, and anybody born in the future if their name at Lattimore, I hope they don't want to go do someone Internet, because I own it all. My website is at Lattimore DOT com. My twitter handles at lad to more, my instagram is Atlantima, my facebook is Atlantimore. Uh, you'll be able to get in touch with me there and I am highly responsive because I never stopped being grateful for for the fact that people want to pay attention to what I have to say right, but because that's how that's that's how it how the whole machine works. So I always try to respond to emails, messages, anything, anything like that. Fantastic, ladies and gentlemen. The authentic tip of the day from Mr Ed Lattimore. It's okay in life to transition from what you've known to something new. And when from boxing to writing to teach, it has a degree in physics. These are things that we always talk about. You have to learn how to use your your subconscious or your superpower to push towards greatness and you are not required to be the same person you were five minutes ago. You can change, you can go after more, you can do more, you can be more. Like Ed said, fighting he had enough. He said I wasn't as sharp as I am or I used to be. Now it's time to move on. In Life, if you're struggling and you have a passion or something you can do and you know you can do it well, it's okay to move on, to be very strategic and be very efficient and how you move on again. And thank you for joining us. This was our special episode, Mr Ed Lattimore. I'm Marcus, often the host to get often too with Marcus show have a great day,.

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