Get Authentic with Marques Ogden
Get Authentic with Marques Ogden

Episode 24 · 3 weeks ago

Get Authentic with Marques Ogden - Dan Mahony

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Marques speaks with Dan Mahoney

YEA, hollybody and welcome back to the get off with Marcus show. I'm your host, Marcus soften. This episode number eleven. We have a fantastic guest, glorady to join us today, Mr Dan Mahoney, great friend, great client out of the Atlanta area. But before we get to day and when I think a few of our amazing sponsors, century one connect realty with LEA balet nationwide exteriors, a roofing extereor business out of Orlando Florida. Deflect Tech LLC, a shoulder pat protection device by coach Cochera, Bill Keiper and associates, a consulting brand out of the Ohio area, and Bigel, speaking my good friend and client Lloyd Morrison, and do speaking to sports programs all across the country, now here. He is my good friend and coaching client. Mr Dan Mahoney. Dan, thanks for joinings to get off this with Marcus show. How are you doing today, sir? Hey, Marcus, great, thanks for having me today. I'm excited to be on your program thank you for joining us, Dan. So, before we get started with the interview, ask every guest the same question. What does authentic slash authenticity mean? To them. So for me, Marcus, authenticity and what means authentic to me is just being true to yourself and being yourself, as simple as that. So then, let me ask you this question. Let's get really know for a second. A lot of people are not true to themselves, they're not real themselves. They want to live what I call a phony or a you know, trying to people with the Jones this type of lifestyle. Why do you think that is? And why do more people are just not happy with being who they are? Well, and I could speak from experience with that, because I lived my life at one time in my life like that, and I think, I think you maybe it's a point in your life that you're always trying to chase that brass ring and and and you know enough is not enough. And you know, I have to think back of something my mother told me a long time ago, and it took me a while to realize it as I got older, is happiness is wanting what you already have. And you know, when I when I when I think about that now, I mean, you know, I didn't think about that is much when I was younger, because I was always chasing for more and more and more so, then let's go ahead tell a little bit about yourself...

...upbringing education and share with the on some of your authentic wheel stories about which you've gone through to kind of get where you are today. Yeah, okay. So I was born in the Chicago area and I lived there until two thousand and six. Uh was married there, raised the family with three children and UH went to school at Elmhurst College. I had marketing degree from Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, actually now elmhurst university. Um, and as I started out in the food service business I worked my first job out of college was Keebler Company and uh, and you know me, Marcus, I'm six FT three and working for the Keebler Elph was kind of funny. UH, my boss at the time was like five ft two, so that was always fun working with them on calls. So, uh, I got into I moved into healthcare technology uh soon after that and that kind of launched my career and I worked in hospital information systems for companies like mckesson. I went to U Dell in their healthcare division and then I started with a company early two thousands which was carestream. At the time it was practice works turned into care stream dental and at one time they were owned by Kodak. So I had a lot of corporate experience over that time. Uh, during my uh during my tenure as a national sales director for actually was a regional director for carestream, I went and got my m B A. I did my online NBA Through University of Phoenix from two thousand four to two thousand six. So yeah, so that, you know, I think I needed that at the time to move up to the next level and you know, NBA it was pretty much a requirement at that time. And you know, I did it at probably the busiest point in my career, traveling all over the country, all over North America, and doing it on an online course back in two thousand four, when, you know, I think about sitting on those airplanes, you know how bad those airplane uh hotspots and Internet is. It was even worse than two thousand four sitting there trying to do discussion questions and write papers online, but I didn't. So so you did that. And then talk about your then progression. I remember you mentioned to me in Oh eight some stuff happened with work and you kind of went through our challenging time right now then you know where we are in two a lot of people, I've been hit by Covid or by the pandemic or uh, you know, struggles or frustrations or anxiety or stress, and I wasn't to understand that everybody who's been successful,...

...he's had to go through something, something has made them who they are to be able to push through. And you have an amazing story. Were touched a little bit yesterday. I think you showed are always about some of the things that you had to go through, some of the trials tribulations to kind of get where you are today professionally, as a very successful entrepreneur. So in two, in two thousand six, I received the promotion and the promotion meant to move to Atlanta and at the and I have I had three children, uh, and I took my I took the promotion and pretty much took my wife at the time and my children, uh, kicking and scream into Atlanta. So we moved here. We got the big house, bigger than we probably could afford, but they liked it the big house. We were trying to keep up with the Joneses. We're buying extra cars, we were, you know, going on you know, elaborate vacations. We were doing a lot of things, uh that probably at the time we're not good idea, maybe living over our means, even though, you know, my income was well. So then two thousand eight hits and the mortgage crisis hits and we go into a recession in two thousand nine. And at that point, not only that, I was I going through a divorce, but I lost my job. My job was eliminated and through the divorce. Uh, and because of the House we bought, uh, we were, you know, in financial room. We had to sell a house and pretty much short sale of house. So I went from having everything to pretty much having you know, almost starting from scratch. Wow. So so let's talk a little bit about that day. Let's get real. When you were starting over and you were starting from scratch, what's the first thing you did, because people know my story when I lost everything, got down here, inspired from a couple of jobs, had to figure out what the heck was going on. I started just by writing down my free biggest strengths and trying to compute what I should be doing. So, when you were going through that financial ruin, tough time rebuilding, what was the first thing you did. So I get yourself back on track? Well, I started doing something I'd never had done before, much was networking, because I always worked for big companies and big corporations. You know, when you do that sometimes you find that you live on an island because you only know the people in those industries, in those areas. You are so um. I started to learn to network and I shifted my focus versus working for big corporations to work for smaller companies and UH and that really really helped me and really since that, two thousand nine, until I started my business in two thousand and eighteen, I worked for all smaller organizations. So now let's chat about what is Damn Mahoney doing today? So you went through, you know, divorce, my answer, ruin,...

...got yourself back on your feet, went forward working corporate, had great success. Then, I guess it's guess, two thousand and eight teen, if I'm not mistaken, you decided to launch and become an entrepreneur. A lot of people then want to become an entrepreneur, they want to start a business, they want to live what we call that American dream. But I tell you all the time, sometimes a dream could be a nightmare, because it's really hard to get things going if you don't understand four key areas, marketing, sales, operations and finance. So how did you transition Dan from Corporate America to become an entrepreneur, and what are you doing today as a very successful entrepreneur in the corporate space? So, and you know, my transition really started at the end of two thousand and seventeen when I just got burned out and I couldn't do it anymore because I was traveling so much. I was remarried, uh, and you know, and we had talked about this interestingly, in love. I met my wife into thousand nine when I was going through my divorce and at the time, uh, with no job, no financial room and Um, and really going through the divorce. Uh, she she found something in me and helped me get to where I am today. So and I didn't even wasn't able to start my business without her because, Um, you know, I always needed that security because my my children were younger and I needed that. I was less risk averse back then, you know, because I needed to have a salary and things. So, fast forward to two thousand and eighteen. I wanted to try to find more balance in my life and I didn't have the balance of my life because I was always out of town and I was never here and even when I was here, I wasn't present. So that was that's the reason why I started the business uh in two thousand eighteen, and I mentioned to you uh that was my birthday present on my fiftieth birthday, as I signed the papers and incorporated my business and just decided that, you know, I'm gonna go for it and start a consulting practice. So then let's chat about Your Business Today. You're a consulting practice. What type of consulting? What do you do for your clients? WHO's a perfect client? Share a little bit about that, because we have a very large artist of people that are in corporate America that are always potentially looking for a consultants to help them with their so what type of consulting do you do that and who's a nice target, ideal client? Yeah, so the consulting I do is I work with business owners and CEOS as a sales consultant. And you know, many companies struggle. You talked about those four things. One of them they struggle with is sales, and especially the you know, most of the business owners that I work with are either entrepreneurs or developers or makers or something, and they've grown these businesses and they've only take them to a point where now it's time to accelerate their growth and go higher and they don't really know how to do it and...

...they struggle to do it because there's still the CEO, they're still the head of sales and they're usually the top revenue producer in their company as well. So they have all those responsibilities and and wearing multiple hats. The sales part of it is the hardest one that they typically have to to to shed and get somebody in. So I come in and my business is focused on helping CEOS and business owners really look at their business and how can we create the right sales foundation and organizational foundation for sales for you to, you know, experience the type of growth you're looking for and really to pull yourself out of that sales business. That's that sales part of it. Um many of the clients I get are usually going through some type of eggs. They're thinking about selling their business and or they're thinking about transition their business and when they find their valuation comes back and their businesses and worth is much as they want it to be. It has to do with the fact that they are the company and there's not much left to the company when they leave. So that the sales part too, a good part of that to work out, and that's kind of where I come in and try to help them. I just took notes then on. You know sales, and I have an Acron for sales. Strong, action oriented, lay out your y efficient strategies. What do you find is one of the biggest areas of deficiencies people have with sales, like because, again, marketing is a huge part of any business, right, because you don't market, people can't find you. But if you can't convert sales or you can't close sales, you will not eat. It's just not possible, because if you don't have business coming in or revenue coming in, you will starve. Where do you see people have a willy, difficult time or trajectory when it comes to sales? So the biggest problem I see with companies is they don't really have a strong sales process. They know when they get a lead and the lead comes in, they know what the end is is they want to close the lead, but all the things that happen into between are the parts that they don't always have organized and they don't really understand sometimes the sales process they're in. So you know, consequently enough, six of all sales calls that companies reps make are scrap and waste, and that means that they pretty much have a first call and they go know anywhere, go no or think about the productivity that's lost if you're a sales sales person and six out of every ten sales calls you go on never go anywhere after that first call. So that is a big problem a lot of companies have and what that does is it leads to the inability to create new business and new accounts. A lot of the companies just live on existing accounts. They have all their eggs and two or three clients and they have hard time...

...building business. UH, they have trouble finding the right people and even when they do find the right people, when they come in, they have a hard time getting them successful because they don't have any way. Once they're there, how do you onboard them? How do we build them up to make them successful within the company? So let's go back and let's get real about. You said sixty are scrapped and waste. What is it that that number is so high? Our sales people not qualified? Are They not trained properly? Do they not know how to co call is per se, or what do you think is missing in that number? Why it's so high? Because six then scrapping waste. That's a lot of wasted time. And if I tell my clients, if you're not talking to people well, if you're not marketing to pre qualify, I predisposed leads, the sales process is much more arduous and much more difficult because you're not talking to somebody that probably is a good fit to do business with. So why did the number is so high? The numbers typically high. Is because sales professionals do a poor job at call planning. And it really comes down to call planning is, if you're going in to meet with a client for the first time, are you do you really know what you're going in for? Are you prepped on what you know about the company, what you know about the people you're meeting with? Ye, I think back when I started in sales, we had yellow pages and we had libraries to go to. Now there's a wealth of information the Internet that you could find about companies and people, and sales reps don't do a really good job doing that, and that's part of the qualification process as well. They spend too much time working on opportunities that really don't have a chance to close. So one of the things as a sales consult my health companies do is help them what they're called planning, but put in a repeatable sales process in in the mix that is repeatable, that's going to give them the type of results we're looking for. So each step in the process is well defined, all the things that need to happen in each of those stages, all the qualification questions are all defined, so as you start getting towards the end you don't run into those hey, I thought this was gonna close, but now it didn't close because we missed something. The goal is to build something's repeatable for an organization. So an interesting point. You said people don't have like a system in place. I tell clients all the time people have between fifty to a hundred thousand thoughts in a day and if you think that you as that one salesperson, they're probably talking to hundreds, if not more, it's gonna stand out in their mind just because you need to have...

...you have a long day ahead of you, because that's not the case, and I feel salespeople sometimes forget that the fortune is in the follow up. It's all about staying in front of people, but not being pesky or not being overbearing, but being somebody that they know is consistent in that process. I have a client that it's like that. We were popcorn, my good friend Tim ingle. That's how we became so good at friends. I met him in two thousand nineteen. I stayed consistent with my follow up over seven months and I got worked with his company where it was at his old company. Now is at a new company, and so we're working for them starting in August and it's just been consistent flow and again following up with people. Then with your consulting practice, how do you teach people to follow up or in another level, how do you teach people the art? I'm just staying on people's radar but at the same time not being overbearing and not being somebody and see as a pest they don't want to do business with. You know, I think part of that is just understanding what the sales processes and you know, uh and there is trying to find that balance. And if you as a salesperson, you know understand what the buying processes and and you try to take your selling process to fit it in with the customers buying process. You know, I try to tell and most of a lot of the clients I work with their more strategic, long term sales versus transactional sales. So you know, I put it like this. Look, we're, we're a sale is sometimes like a to flay. If you've ever made a c flay, I love to cook. Flay has to be cooked at the right temperature at the right time. You can't rush it to flay. You can't turn up the heat and cook it faster. It's gonna Finish when it's gonna finish. So you know, sometimes part of it is patients and and just patients, persistence and and good communication with your with your with your with your prospect m Dan, as we get ready to rep this amazing interview, I have one final question I like you to really expand upon for our listeners. Well, two questions actually. First of all, what's been a good sales book or consulting book that you've read to help you become the expert sales concern that you are today. So, Oh God, I have. If you see behind me, I have a whole list. I have a whole library of sales books. Um, you know, one of my one of my favorite ones that I'm reading now and I've read and and I facilitate for is level five selling and level five coaching. Uh. That is an excellent book written by John Hoskins. I definitely recommend that. Uh, you know, that helps. It's a it's a them and talks about how you can better get...

...into call execution and call planning. Um, probably one of my favorite sales books as well is, you know, I it's not even a sales book, it's just the seven habits of highly successful people. I love that book, Stephen Covey, and you know I always recommend that book for anyone you know, especially sales is to learn those learn those habits for success. Fantastic and damn. My last question is somebody right now listen to this episode and they're, like you, burnt out. They they traveling a lot or, you know, covid has unfortunately wiped out their job. You were laid off, you know, back in two thousand and eight, so you know what that's like. And they want to start their own consulting business. What is one piece of advice that Damn Mahoney would tell them to do in order to get started in trying to build a consulting bus this for themselves? So, you know, the advice I'd give to somebody is really, if you're going to get into consulting, get into a consulting business that you really like and something you're gonna feel like you get up in the morning and you're not working. Uh, that that's one advice I would give. And you know, don't be afraid to take a risk, and I know that's hard, uh, you know, but you you know, you know, take a measured risk. Um, talk to people who have been in consulting. UH, follow up and, you know, look and do your research. But there's a lot of business out there for consultants, and I mean for you know, fractional leaders, whether it's in sales, whether it's marketing, whether it's operations. With the hiring that is going on now and the lack of people to to to fill these jobs, they're looking more and more to consultants. And I'll say this and closing. You know, if you look at history, consulting is very successful when economy is good and when the economy is not good, because companies are always looking for expertise, audience. The authentic tip for the day don't be afraid to step out and take calculated risk. Not Telling you to quit your job and go start a business and say hey, Hey, hall here I am ready to go. Not Saying that, we're saying if you're working a job but you want to pursue something else, work your job and then make your side Hustle, your passion, hope to become your full time career by doing on the side. But, like Dan said, don't be afraid to take risk. Don't be afraid to venture out and go for what you want. You need to invest in your number one asset, which is you, and by doing that and by putting yourself in position to win, everything else will take care of itself. But it starts with you investing you. You have to see it, feel it, believe it...

...and then let it go to the universe. The universe will be taking care of you if you were taking care of you first. Dan, thanks for joining us. Everybody, listen to the get off into with Marcus show. I'm your host, Marcus og then, have a fantastic day.

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